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MoMA CLASSES

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The People’s Art Center

A central part of MoMA's program from 1948 to 1961, The People’s Art Center was conceived as an incubator for critical thinking, art making, and creativity. It's this mission that drives what we do today, and that inspired our new fall series of programs.

Immerse yourself in ideas and opportunities to see your world in new ways through art. Classes, artist-led immersions, and experiences can help you develop new perspectives and become a part of a community of learners unlike any other. In our studios and galleries, you can co-create artworks with MoMA’s artists; on the streets of Midtown, explore the neighborhood with our experts; and dive deep into new concepts and new conversations with innovators and visionaries.

If you can’t make it to MoMA, we also offer both instructor-led and self-guided MoMA Courses Online. Learn more about MoMA Courses Online.


Artist-Led (Immersions)

Join prominent contemporary artists and MoMA staff in conversation, art making, and collaborative experiences as you explore MoMA’s collection and exhibitions.


Allisonsmith-s

Allison Smith: American Pre-Modern

April 26
1 Saturday and 1 Sunday
Instructor: Allison Smith

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Allisonsmith

How do colonial-era American craft and modernism go hand-in-hand? Both art movements were furthered by the Rockefeller family, who built Colonial Williamsburg from 1927 onwards, and MoMA from 1929 onwards. Both projects were concerned with a search for what is distinctively American. The recent MoMA exhibition American Modern: Hopper to O'Keeffe touched upon MoMA founding Director Alfred H. Barr's interest in developing genealogical narratives for American art. He and others asked the essentialist question: Is there such a thing as a uniquely (North) American" art? For Barr, the narrative of American art began with folk art. This course looks at the period of 1790–1840, locating a pre-modern precedent for American art not in the representational, accessible folk art paintings that Barr favored, but in everyday things created by people who did not consider themselves artists or designers (but who perhaps should be by today's standards). These artists also sought to stake out an American creative quality apart from that of Europe, but they did so through three-dimensional objects and all-encompassing domestic interiors: ceramics, textiles, furniture, floor coverings, lighting fixtures, and other forms of interior decoration. This course asks participants to consider even earlier forms of sculpture, installation, and social practice: American pre-modern.

Allison Smith has been exhibiting, performing, and teaching professionally since 1995 throughout the United States, England, France, Germany, New Zealand, and South Korea. Smith has lectured extensively at art schools and research universities in the United States and abroad, and at MoMA, the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, SculptureCenter, and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics. She is a tenured professor and Chair of the Sculpture Program at California College of the Arts in San Francisco.

Register Online
Day

Saturday and Sunday

Sessions

2

Time

12:30–4:30 p.m.

Schedule
4/26, 4/27
Non Member

$50

Member and Corporate Member employees

$35

Sound Amplification Available
Pacocao-s

Paco Cao: Psychological Cocktail Services—Theory and Practice

SOLD OUT

April 24th
1 Thursday
Instructor: Paco Cao

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Pacocao

Learn to create cocktails based on MoMA’s collection. Artist and expert psychological cocktail maker Paco Cao leads a workshop comprised of four primary components. First, a guided tour of avant-garde masterpieces in MoMA’s galleries highlights the importance of bars and drinks for the avant-garde. Second, workshop participants are introduced to the process involved in the making of psychological cocktails, which inverts the way we usually consume cocktails. Instead of selecting drinks from a predetermined menu, the client fills out a questionnaire and, according to their answers, the artist creates a personalized recipe for each client. Third, workshop participants are invited to actively collaborate with the artist in the design of a MoMA-specific questionnaire based on the Museum’s collection, uncovering the symbolic and psychological power of those works of art. Finally, the class culminates in a celebratory, hedonistic event held at MoMA's Terrace 5, during which Dr. Cao will provide psychological cocktail services for the enjoyment of the participants.

Paco Cao is unfaithful to any particular medium. Employing a wide range of disciplines and materials, his work establishes a strong relationship between art, audience, and context as it challenges the boundaries between high and low culture. His work has been shown at and/or made in collaboration with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, El Museo del Barrio, Creative Time, and the New Museum in New York City, as well as El Prado Museum (Madrid, Spain), MART (Rovereto, Italy), BOZAR (Brusells, Belgium), MUSAC (León, Spain), and MNCARS (Madrid, Spain). Cao holds a PhD in art history from the University of Oviedo, Spain.

Day

Thursday

Sessions

1

Time

6:30-9:30 p.m.

Schedule
4/24
Non Member

$150

Light refreshments included
Member and Corporate Member employees

$100

Light refreshments included
Sound Amplification Available
Contemporary Issues

Join these multisession intensive courses that provide unexpected perspectives on contemporary art practice.


Modern Art and Ideas

“Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences.”—Brian Eno

Explore various periods of modern and contemporary art through programs led by MoMA curators and other prominent experts, both inside and outside MoMA’s galleries.


Moma_polke_ch2014_1371-s

Taking the Matter in Hand: Sigmar Polke, 1963–2010

Starts April 22
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Ágnes Berecz

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Was Sigmar Polke “just a little bit too much for everybody,” as John Baldessari stated a few years ago? How can we approach a body of work that has been routinely described as polyphonic, masterly, willfully pathetic, and alchemistic, and that defied all established boundaries of art in the late 20th century with momentous irreverence? By exploring MoMA's Polke retrospective, this short course provides a comprehensive examination of the artist’s paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, films, performances, and photo works from the early 1960s to 2010.

Ágnes Berecz (PhD, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) teaches modern and contemporary art history at the Pratt Institute and in the School of Graduate Studies of the Fashion Institute of Technology. Her writings have been published in Art in America, Artmargins, and Praesens, and in European and U.S. exhibition catalogues.

Register Online
Day

Tuesdays

Sessions

4

Time

7:30–9:30 p.m.

Schedule
4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/20 (No class 5/13)
Non Member

$350

Member and Corporate Member employees

$300

Sound Amplification Available
Studio Immersions

Make art in collaboration with contemporary artists.


Frequently Asked Questions


Payment

We accept all major credit cards. To register and pay visit the online registration system.

Discount

Students, educators (K–12, college, and university), and staff of other museums receive a 10% discount on the member rate. Student or staff identification must be presented upon check-in on the first day of class. Please note this discounted rate does not apply to Early Bird prices.

Refunds

In order to receive a full refund, notice of cancellation must be sent in writing via e-mail, letter, or fax at least one week before the first scheduled day of class. Payment will not be refunded after this time. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.


If I drop the class can I get a refund?
You will only receive a refund if you cancel your registration at least one week before the first day of class. You may do this by accessing your online registration and clicking the "Modify" tab. You will be able to unregister yourself from a class and receive a full refund. You may also cancel your registration by phone or e-mail. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.

Can I get a refund after the second or third class?
MoMA is unable to grant refunds after the refund period.

If I miss a class can I receive a refund or a make up classes with the instructor?
No. MoMA provides course schedules in advance to provide perspective students the opportunity to plan ahead and make necessary arrangements to attend classes. Students will receive a syllabus and course reader in advance to help themselves prepare for missing class.

Can I take a MoMA Class for credit?
No. MoMA Classes are not accredited. If you wish to receive credit for a MoMA Class, you must organize this with your institution.

How do I register?
All registration is done online. Registration for Winter/Spring 2014 classes will open on January 2, 2014, at 9:30 a.m. To register for online courses, use the online registration system.

Do I have to register online?
Yes. If you have any difficulties using the online registration system, please call (212) 408-8441.

How do I know if a class is full?
If a class is full the website will indicate that the course is sold out. Please note that updates to class availability are made during business hours and courses may fill up overnight or over the weekend. You will know a course is sold out when you attempt to register and the only option you are given is to add your name to the waiting list.

Can I be put on a waiting list for a class that is filled?
Yes. The online registration form includes a waiting list option for sold-out classes. You must fill out the online registration form to be added to the waiting list. Once you complete the registration, you will receive an e-mail confirming that you have been added to the waiting list.

What if I am a member of the Museum?
As a member at the individual level or higher you will receive the members rate. We honor a first-come, first-served policy for class registration regardless of your member status.

How do I sign up for a membership?
If you are not a member and would like to sign up for membership, simply visit the Membership page. If you have any questions about membership, please call Membership Services at (212) 708-9475.

Are Corporate Member employees eligible to receive the member discount?
Yes. A copy of your valid company ID must be faxed or e-mailed to the Corporate Membership Department in order to receive the discounted price.

Will the class have access to the galleries?
When possible, as determined by your instructor and MoMA, students will have the unique privilege to view MoMA's collection in the galleries after hours, during class time.

Will these specific courses be offered again?
Yes and no. There are some courses that will be offered regularly, for example Modern Art 1880–1945 and Modern and Contemporary Art 1945–Present. Some classes may be offered again depending on the instructor's availability, scheduling, and student interest. MoMA cannot guarantee if or when certain classes will be offered again.

If I miss a class and there is another section of the same class being offered on a different day, can I attend the other section of the same course?
No. Each course instructor utilizes a different syllabus. Although there are two sections of the same class offered, the material covered would not necessarily correspond.

Can I register my friend?
Yes. Once you have entered your personal information and selected a class in the online registration form, click the "Add Person" button. Fill out the registration form for this person and be sure to use a separate e-mail address for him or her. Our registration system will not accept multiple registrants with the same e-mail address. Your registration is complete after you have filled out all the required information for both you and your friend and submitted payment. Please note that you will each receive an e-mail confirming your individual registration. Your confirmation e-mail will NOT include a record of your friend's registration information.

Can I bring a friend or family member to attend one of my class sessions so they can experience the program?
No. Though we welcome interest in MoMA Classes, we cannot accommodate guests.


Policies

MoMA reserves the right to cancel or withdraw classes, to change class curricula and scheduling, and to withdraw and substitute instructors.

If an instructor needs to cancel an individual class, we will notify you via phone or e-mail and that class will be made up at a later date.

Students accept full responsibility for personal injury and/or losses suffered during class hours and while on museum premises.

MoMA will not release course participants’ personal information to any persons or organizations outside of the Museum without prior written consent.

Past Classes

Pollockone-s

The Materials and Techniques of Abstract Expressionism

SOLD OUT

Starts February 10
6 Mondays
Instructor: Corey D’Augustine

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Pollockone

This course leads students in a hands-on examination of the materials and techniques that created some of the 20th century’s greatest paintings. An introductory class covers the basics of preparing a canvas and mixing and applying paint, and each subsequent class focuses on a major artist in MoMA’s collection. Artists examined include Barnett Newman, Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, and Willem de Kooning. Each week students explore one of these artists through slide lectures and visits to MoMA’s galleries before painting a canvas based on that painter’s work. Combining studio techniques, visual analysis, and art historical insights, this class offers a unique appreciation of how the materiality of paint and the activity of painting affected the development of Abstract Expressionism.

Corey D'Augustine is a painting conservator, a professor of art history, and an artist.

Day

Mondays

Sessions

6

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
2/10, 2/24, 3/3, 3/10, 3/24, 3/31 (No Class 2/17 or 3/17)
Non Member

$510

*Materials Included

Member and Corporate Member employees

$450

*Materials Included

Sound Amplification Available
Warholmarilyn-s

Modern and Contemporary Art 1945–1970

Starts February 12
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: MoMA staff and special guests

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Warholmarilyn

This course examines major artists, artworks, and movements after World War II. Students explore the emergence of the New York School and its links to a new global economy centered in New York, Dada's revival and Pop art's flowering in mass consumer society, and Minimalism's formal refinement and emphasis on spatial context. During the course, students learn about works by Jackson Pollock, Jean Dubuffet, Alberto Giacometti, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, and others.

You can experience this class in one of two ways:

Option 1: Lecture + in-gallery discussions
Lecture followed by breakout group discussions led by curatorial staff in the Museum galleries. Meets from 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.

OR

Option 2: Lecture only
Sign up for just the lecture portion, which meets from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

You can select either option during the registration process.

*Students interested in this course may also wish to enroll in Modern and Contemporary Art, 1970 to Today.

Register Online
Day

Wednesdays

Sessions

4

Time

6:30–8:45 p.m.

6:30–7:30 p.m. [lecture only]
Schedule
2/12, 2/19, 2/26, 3/5
Non Member

Lecture and In-Gallery Discussion:

$325

Lecture Only:

$150

Member and Corporate Member employees

Lecture and In-Gallery Discussion:

$275

Lecture Only:

$125

Sound Amplification Available
Duchampvalise-s

Thierry de Duve: Marcel Duchamp’s Message

Starts February 20
3 Thursdays
Instructor: Thierry De Duve

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Duchampvalise

Join Thierry de Duve for a three-part lecture series on the art and legacy of Marcel Duchamp, exploring his dynamic and ongoing challenge to the art world, his roots in the world of French modernism, and the invention of “non-art” in an attempt to meet his challenge:

Anything Goes

In 1917, Marcel Duchamp put a message in the mail in the guise of a urinal he baptized “Fountain.” It did not arrive until the 1960s, when it was immediately read by many as meaning that anything could be art and, therefore, anybody could be an artist. What remains of that message, once we correct its utopian reception in the 1960s and respect the logic of the facts? I shall argue that it invites us to re-examine the demise of the French Beaux-Arts system in the 1880s, and to draw the consequences for today.

Modernist Painting

Modernism was born in Paris around the middle of the 19th century. Why there and then? What was modernism an answer to? I shall argue that the French Beaux-Arts system—with its unique conflict between the State’s control over the careers of artists and the free access to the Salon by the public—has everything to do with the content of modernist painting and the form it took in the work of Gustave Courbet and Édouard Manet.

The Invention of Non-Art

Used to refer to Dada and Neo-Dada works, "non-art" and "anti-art" were fashionable terms in the art criticism of the 1960s. Probably no work was called non-art more often than Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain (1917). I shall argue that it is an optical illusion to believe that non-art was invented by Duchamp or the Dadaists. I shall then defend the view that non-art is actually a side-effect of the 19th-century French Beaux-Arts system, an involuntary consequence of the binary structure of aesthetic judgment at the Salon.

Thierry de Duve is a historian and philosopher of art living and teaching in New York. In pursuing the work accomplished in Kant after Duchamp (MIT Press, 1996), he has undertaken to revisit modernism in order to better understand the present.

Register Online
Day

Thursdays

Sessions

3

Time

6:30-8:30 p.m.

Schedule
2/20, 2/27, 3/6
Non Member

$75

Member and Corporate Member employees

$50

Sound Amplification Available
Pricetower-s

Frank Lloyd Wright and the Modern Metropolis

SOLD OUT

Starts February 20
6 Thursdays
Instructor: Jennifer Gray

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Pricetower

Frank Lloyd Wright was a preeminent theorist of modern cities, skyscrapers, infrastructure, and compact, prefabricated dwellings, a fact obscured by his long association with a regionalist school of architecture based in the Midwest and with his sprawling “prairie style” houses. This course examines the whole of Wright’s various, sometimes competing architectural visions—his pioneering abstract houses, and his radical skyscraper designs for New York City; iconic buildings such as the Guggenheim Museum, and his utopian scheme for urbanizing the entire American landscape called “Broadacre City”—and also explores his theories regarding mechanization and industry, the nature of materials, and the politics of social democracy. His visionary and comprehensive practice places him within an international network of modern architects, including Mies van der Rohe and Le Corbusier, who were simultaneously advancing new ideas about our built environment, and reveals that Wright still has remarkable relevance for contemporary concerns about suburban sprawl, urban density, and environmental sustainability. Special attention will be paid to the upcoming MoMA exhibition Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal and recent acquisitions from the Frank Lloyd Foundation through gallery visits and the hands-on study of archival materials.

Jennifer Gray (PhD, Columbia University) is a historian of modern art and architecture, specializing in the relationships between social politics and the built environment. Her work has been published in Future Anterior, Il Giornale Dell 'Architettura, and SmartPlanet. She is adjunct assistant professor at Columbia University and a lecturer at MoMA.

Day

Thursdays

Sessions

6

Time

7:30–9:30 p.m.

Schedule
2/20, 2/27, 3/6, 3/13, 3/20, 3/27
Non Member

$450

Member and Corporate Member employees

$400

Sound Amplification Available
Genzken-s

Techno, Nightlife, and Free Expression in the Work of Isa Genzken

February 20
1 Thursday
Instructor: Spencer Sweeney and Marianne Eggler

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Genzken

This intensive explores the relationship between visual art and music in conjunction with the special exhibition Isa Genzken: Retrospective, the largest solo show thus far of the German artist’s work. Just as the emergence of abstract art went hand-in-hand with the birth of non-traditional, avant-garde music in the early 20th century, many of today’s artists are inspired by current trends in music. We will consider Genzken’s artwork in the context of techno, a form of electronic dance music that has proven extremely popular in Germany, and particularly in Berlin, Genzken’s home for much of her life.

During this one-night experience you will walk through the exhibition after hours with contemporary artist Spencer Sweeney and art historian Marianne Eggler; travel to Sweeney’s nightclub to listen to techno music; and enjoy an artist-inspired beverage.

Please note, this unique intensive will travel off-site and subway fare is not included.

Spencer Sweeney was born in 1973 in Philadelphia. Since emerging onto the New York art and music scene in the late 1990s, Sweeney’s genre-defying creative practice has been characterized by an ever-moving, multifaceted nature, incorporating a breadth of roles including club owner, nightlife promoter, visual artist, musician, and DJ. As a musician he is best known as the drummer and keyboardist of the popular but short-lived art rock duo Actress, alongside Lizzi Bougatsos of Gang Gang Dance. Sweeney’s main engagement with visual and conceptual art comes in the forms of curating, painting, and performance-based installation. His approach to art is often in opposition to traditional norms defined by the museum or gallery space, as evidenced by his 2009 solo show at Gavin Brown‘s enterprise, for which he moved into the gallery—studio and all. Sweeney lives and works in New York.

Marianne Eggler is an art and design historian, with a particular focus on German culture, who has been a MoMA lecturer since 1998. She has taught and lectured widely both here and abroad and is currently a visiting professor at Manhattan College and an adjunct assistant professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology. She lived for nearly five years in Munich, and her favorite band is Kraftwerk.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

1

Time

7:00-10:00 p.m.

Schedule
2/20
Non Member

$100

Light refreshments included
Member and Corporate Member employees

$75

Light refreshments included
Sound Amplification Available
Pacocao-s

Paco Cao: Psychological Cocktail Services—Theory and Practice

SOLD OUT

February 27
1 Thursday
Instructor: Paco Cao

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Pacocao

Learn to create cocktails based on MoMA’s collection. Artist and expert psychological cocktail maker Paco Cao leads a workshop comprised of four primary components. First, a guided tour of avant-garde masterpieces in MoMA’s galleries highlights the importance of bars and drinks for the avant-garde. Second, workshop participants are introduced to the process involved in the making of psychological cocktails, which inverts the way we usually consume cocktails. Instead of selecting drinks from a predetermined menu, the client fills out a questionnaire and, according to their answers, the artist creates a personalized recipe for each client. Third, workshop participants are invited to actively collaborate with the artist in the design of a MoMA-specific questionnaire based on the Museum’s collection, uncovering the symbolic and psychological power of those works of art. Finally, the class culminates in a celebratory, hedonistic event held at MoMA's Terrace 5, during which Dr. Cao will provide psychological cocktail services for the enjoyment of the participants.

Paco Cao is unfaithful to any particular medium. Employing a wide range of disciplines and materials, his work establishes a strong relationship between art, audience, and context as it challenges the boundaries between high and low culture. His work has been shown at and/or made in collaboration with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, El Museo del Barrio, Creative Time, and the New Museum in New York City, as well as El Prado Museum (Madrid, Spain), MART (Rovereto, Italy), BOZAR (Brusells, Belgium), MUSAC (León, Spain), and MNCARS (Madrid, Spain). Cao holds a PhD in art history from the University of Oviedo, Spain.

Day

Thursday

Sessions

1

Time

6:30-9:30 p.m.

Schedule
2/27
Non Member

$150

Light refreshments included
Member and Corporate Member employees

$100

Light refreshments included
Sound Amplification Available
Evamelasbattlepassproject-s

Battle Pass

March 1
1 Saturday
Instructor: Sasha Chavchavadze and the Battle Pass Collective

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Evamelasbattlepassproject

Investigate the ambiguity and complexity of the subject of war through the Battle Pass project. Drawing parallels between past and present, you’ll work with a number of Proteus Gowanus artists and performers as you participate in the process that led to the creation of Battle Pass, based on the 1776 Revolutionary War battle at Gowanus Creek in Brooklyn. This workshop includes a discussion of historic tide mills that once existed throughout the New York area; a Battle Pass performance; hands-on activities, including boat-making; and the creation of cockades, the hallmark of an American Revolutionary.

Exploration, by artists and non-artists alike, is at the heart of Proteus Gowanus’s way of thinking and working. PG is an interdisciplinary collaborative located near Brooklyn’s Gowanus Canal, but it also takes its name from Proteus, the Greek god of the sea, who could readily change his form.

Battle Pass Collective:

Paul Benney is an educator, artist, and performer living in Brooklyn. He teaches recreational arts and coaches at Saint Ann's School.

Sasha Chavchavadze is an artist whose interdisciplinary work has focused on the effect of war on memory and place. She is the founder and co-creative director of Proteus Gowanus.

Angela Kramer teaches Brooklyn history programs at the Old Stone House and works as the administrative director of Proteus Gowanus, where she recently organized an installation on the neighborhood's historic tide mills.

Robyn Love is an artist who has created site-specific installations around the world. She lives and works in Queens.

Eva Melas is a ceramic and multimedia artist whose main concern is environmental issues. She teaches art at Saint Ann's School.

Register Online
Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

1:30–4:30 p.m.

Schedule
3/1
Non Member

$50

Member and Corporate Member employees

$40

Sound Amplification Available
Thewind-s

Silent Sin

Starts March 4
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Anne Morra

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Thewind

For centuries visual artists have been depicting images of the seven deadly sins—lust, gluttony, greed, sloth, wrath, envy, and pride—in their work. The earliest artistic depictions of this taxonomy of sin emerged in religious art. Consider Hieronymus Bosch’s painting The Seven Deadly Sins and the Four Last Things (1485), with its circular presentation of seven events that illustrate man’s various behaviors that lead to an eventual fall. Bosch’s work attempts to create a visual representation of sin and its resultant effects utilizing traditional iconography. These depictions experience significant shifts throughout art history, with less obvious symbolism and more profound exploration into abstract and psychological impulses. From the dawn of motion pictures, filmmakers have been predisposed to investigate these behaviors via secular narratives that illustrate the causes and effects of ethical transgression.

Silent Sin is a weekly examination of offenses, failings, indulgences, crimes, and transgressions in silent film. Sometimes considered old-fashioned, Victorian, or overly occupied with platonic romance, silent film narratives were, on the contrary, often juicy, scandalous, and as spicy as their "talkie" cousins. How did filmmakers in the silent era represent the concept of sin—broadly defined—in the composition of a character? In what ways, other than dialogue, are manifestations of sin depicted? How are visual elements specific to the motion picture, such as lighting, set design, editing, and music, used to portray the seven sins? The films in the course, all drawn from MoMA's collection, are shown with live musical accompaniment, and discussion is encouraged both before and after screenings.

Anne Morra, Associate Curator, Department of Film, MoMA, has organized numerous film exhibitions, including Made at MoMA; 50 Years of James Bond and Visual Poet: Harris Savides. She is a member of the Women's Film Preservation Fund (WFPF) grant-selection committee and her writing can be found on the MoMA Inside/Out blog, and in The Journal of Film Preservation and various exhibition catalogues.

Ben Model, one of the leading silent-film composer/accompanists working in the U.S. today, has been creating and performing musical scores for silent movies for more than a quarter century. He plays piano and theater organ, and has also written orchestral scores. Model has been a resident silent film accompanist at MoMA for 30 years.

Register Online
Day

Tuesdays

Sessions

4

Time

6:30-8:30 p.m.

Schedule
3/4, 3/11, 3/18, 3/25
Non Member

$250

Member and Corporate Member employees

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Albertsoncourseimage-s

Behind the Scenes of MoMA Conservation: What the Conservator Sees

Starts March 5
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Cindy Albertson

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Albertsoncourseimage

This course offers an in-depth behind-the-scenes look at the Museum's conservation department through lectures, tours, readings, and workshops in the conservation spaces. Students are introduced to the various specialties, staff, and facilities that comprise the department, and a sampling of artworks is examined to demonstrate the conservator's standard tool kit, along with an introduction to other examination techniques such as ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence imaging and X-radiography. Mechanisms of deterioration and associated condition issues are outlined, as are common methods of prevention and treatment used across specialties at the Museum. Methods for preventive conservation and disaster preparedness for the artist, small collector, and gallerist are interwoven throughout the course.

Cindy Albertson is an assistant conservator in MoMA's Department of Conservation. She holds an MA with a Certificate of Advanced Study in conservation and an MA in American history with museum studies. She has been a guest lecturer for the Getty's Cleaning Acrylic Painted Surfaces Workshop, the NYU Museum Studies Program, the NYU Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center, and the CUNY Graduate Center, and has lectured to instructors in MoMA's Department of Education. In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, she has served as project manager for the NYC Alliance for Response, a team of volunteers that is forming a New York City–based Collections Emergency Response Team.

Register Online
Day

Wednesdays

Sessions

4

Time

6:30–8:30 p.m.

Schedule
3/5, 3/12, 3/19, 3/26
Non Member

$450

Member and Corporate Member employees

$400

Sound Amplification Available
Proprietor_hi_res-s

Setting Up Shop

March 9
1 Sunday
Instructor: Christine Hill

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Proprietor_hi_res

"Lifelike art makers' principal dialogue is not with art but everything else, one event suggesting another." —Allan Kaprow

Setting Up Shop brings the nuances of behind-the-scenes decision-making and organizational culture at MoMA into fuller view for workshop participants. We explore zones of the Museum beyond the exhibition galleries—the ground-floor design store, the storage facilities, the archives, the cafeteria, the art-handling arenas—to investigate the correlation between services performed in them, aesthetic and contextual decisions made by them, and the daily manner of operations and organization inherent in artistic practice.

This workshop examines the work of a number of artistic practitioners who focus on the ethics and issues of working space, exchange, and the small business. The class mines the transactional space of many service and work environments—both inside and outside of the museum—for artistic content, and considers evident taxonomies of the wares and tools employed in the broader consumer environment. What is the nature of this form of presentation and display and what are the artistic/design elements involved in it? How can we design our ideal transactional enterprise as a part of our daily art/life activity?

Christine Hill is the proprietor of the ongoing multidisciplinary project Volksboutique, a format for discussing industry, artistic economy and autonomy, transactional exchange, and value systems, operating out of a storefront in Berlin's Prenzlauer Berg neighborhood. Her projects examine concepts of valuation in consumer culture and re-invest discarded appurtenances with meaning and use. The subject of shopkeeping in various forms and the implementation of the over-the-counter transaction recur in her work. Since its inception in 1996, Volksboutique has authored and produced numerous installations serving as alternative business models, called Organizational Ventures, commissioned by museums, public art institutions, biennials, and gallery spaces. Hill chairs the Media, Trend & Public Appearance department at the Bauhaus University in Weimar. Her department examines and researches forms of artistic "shopkeeping" and her students execute comprehensive room installations and performative undertakings following the Organizational Ventures model.

Register Online
Day

Sunday

Sessions

1

Time

10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Schedule
3/9
Non Member

$125

Member and Corporate Member employees

$100

Sound Amplification Available
Momagauguin2amatamuathyssen-s

Paul Gauguin: In Search of Modernism's Origins

Starts March 11
7 Tuesdays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff and special guests

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Inspired by the extensive MoMA exhibition Gauguin: Metamorphoses, which emphasizes the 19th-century artist Paul Gauguin’s productive and highly experimental engagement with printmaking, this class attempts to come to terms with the life and work of an oft-mythologized—indeed, self-mythologizing—unconventional, and peripatetic Frenchman. From his relationship with the Impressionist group in the early 1880s, to his role as an avant-garde leader at the end of that decade, through his famous extended sojourns in the South Seas during the 1890s, and finally his death in the Marquesas in 1903, we explore not only Gauguin’s travel itinerary, but his diverse artistic production, varied working processes, and, especially, the radical hybridity and self-referentiality of his practice. Through these efforts, we chart Gauguin’s transformation from a stockbroker, “sunday painter,” and father of five, to his definitive, if still controversial, role as a “paterfamilias” of 20th-century modernism.

Larissa Bailiff (PhD, ABD, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University) is a specialist in 19th-century French art and culture. Formerly an associate educator at MoMA, she has taught graduate and undergraduate courses at the Fashion Institute of Technology and the Pratt Institute. She was recently tapped to serve as the Coordinator for the Center for Curatorial Leadership’s pilot Mellon Foundation Seminar in Curatorial Practice.

Special guests:
Alastair Wright, University Lecturer and Tutorial Fellow, St John's College, University of Oxford, and Chair, Editorial Group, Oxford Art Journal; and Elizabeth Childs, Etta and Mark Steinberg Professor of Modern Art and Chair, Department of Art History and Archaeology, Washington University in St. Louis.

Register Online
Day

Tuesdays

Sessions

7

Time

7:00-9:00 p.m.

Schedule
3/11, 3/18, 3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22
Non Member

$425

Member and Corporate Member employees

$375

Sound Amplification Available
Gonzaleztorresuntitledperfectlovers-s

Contemporary Art 1970–Today

Starts March 12
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: MoMA staff and special guests

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Gonzaleztorresuntitledperfectlovers

This course examines major artists, artworks, and movements from 1970 to the present. Students explore Conceptual art's fundamental questioning of art, the development of multimedia artistic practices and performance art, the influence of identity politics on art, the rise of a global art scene, the and recent tendencies that are still being debated and defined. During this term, students learn about works by artists such as Eva Hesse, Joseph Beuys, Marcel Broodthaers, Vito Acconci, Robert Smithson, Cindy Sherman, Félix González-Torres, Matthew Barney, and others.

You can experience this class in one of two ways:

Option 1: Lecture + in-gallery discussions ($325 non-member/$275 member)
Lecture followed by breakout group discussions led by curatorial staff in the Museum galleries. Meets from 6:30 to 8:45 p.m.

OR

Option 2: Lecture only ($150 non-member/$125 member)
Sign up for just the lecture portion, which meets from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

You can select either option during the registration process.

Register Online
Day

Wednesdays

Sessions

4

Time

6:30–8:45 p.m.

6:30–7:30 p.m. [lecture only]
Schedule
3/12, 3/19, 4/2, 4/9 (No Class on 3/26)
Non Member

Lecture and In-Gallery Discussion:

$325

Lecture Only:

$150

Member and Corporate Member employees

Lecture and In-Gallery Discussion:

$275

Lecture Only:

$125

Sound Amplification Available
Momagauguin3btahitianidolprivatecollection-s

Paul Gauguin: In Search of Modernism's Origins

Starts March 13
5 Thursdays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

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Momagauguin3btahitianidolprivatecollection

Inspired by the extensive MoMA exhibition Gauguin: Metamorphoses, which emphasizes the 19th-century artist Paul Gauguin’s productive and highly experimental engagement with printmaking, this class attempts to come to terms with the life and work of this oft-mythologized—indeed, self-mythologizing—unconventional, and peripatetic Frenchman. From his relationship with the Impressionist group in the early 1880s, to his role as an avant-garde leader at the end of that decade, through his famous extended sojourns in the South Seas during the 1890s, and finally his death in the Marquesas in 1903, we explore not only Gauguin’s travel itinerary, but his diverse artistic production, varied working processes, and, especially, the radical hybridity and self-reference of his practice. Through these efforts, we chart Gauguin’s transformation from a stockbroker, “sunday painter,” and father of five, to his definitive, if still controversial, role as a “paterfamilias” of 20th-century modernism.

Larissa Bailiff (PhD, ABD, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University) is a specialist in 19th-century French art and culture. Formerly an associate educator at MoMA, she has taught graduate and undergraduate courses at the Fashion Institute of Technology and the Pratt Institute. She was recently tapped to serve as the Coordinator for the Center for Curatorial Leadership’s pilot Mellon Foundation Seminar in Curatorial Practice.

Register Online
Day

Thursdays

Sessions

5

Time

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Schedule
3/13, 3/20, 3/27, 4/3 , 4/17 (No class 4/10)
Non Member

$400

Member and Corporate Member employees

$350

Sound Amplification Available
Ginsburg-s

Hope Ginsburg: Objects in Transition

March 15
1 Saturday
Instructor: Hope Ginsburg

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Ginsburg

How can a simple change in materials take something from “everyday” to “uncanny”? In this hands-on workshop, you will transform the identity of an object of your choosing using the traditional techniques of wet and dry felting. Working with natural wool and the partial or whole concealment of a “thing,” discover how meaning shifts when form is manipulated. Begin with a gallery tour looking at "assisted" Readymades, Surrealist objects, and select icons of modern design. Return to the studio for discussion with the artist and instruction in two related textile processes. Once your piece is complete, it will be photographed for an archive of such objects. Then, it is up to you to imagine a place for your re/invention and find space for further intervention.

Hope Ginsburg is a Richmond, Virginia–based artist whose work is informed by curiosity about the natural world, knowledge exchange, and a deep interest in materials—especially fiber and textiles. Her project-based work spans sculpture, performance, and craft. She is an assistant professor at VCUarts, which is also the site of her ongoing artwork Sponge (2006–present), a project about cooperative learning and production.

Register Online
Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

10 a.m.–4 p.m.

Schedule
3/15
Non Member

$125

*Materials Included

Member and Corporate Member employees

$100

*Materials Included

Sound Amplification Available
Pricetower-s

Frank Lloyd Wright and the Modern Metropolis

Starts March 24
6 Mondays
Instructor: Jennifer Gray

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Pricetower

Frank Lloyd Wright was a preeminent theorist of modern cities, skyscrapers, infrastructure, and compact, prefabricated dwellings, a fact obscured by his long association with a regionalist school of architecture based in the Midwest and with his sprawling “prairie style” houses. This course examines the whole of Wright’s various, sometimes competing architectural visions—his pioneering abstract houses, and his radical skyscraper designs for New York City; iconic buildings such as the Guggenheim Museum, and his utopian scheme for urbanizing the entire American landscape called “Broadacre City”—and also explores his theories regarding mechanization and industry, the nature of materials, and the politics of social democracy. His visionary and comprehensive practice places him within an international network of modern architects, including Mies van der Rohe and Le Corbusier, who were simultaneously advancing new ideas about our built environment, and reveals that Wright still has remarkable relevance for contemporary concerns about suburban sprawl, urban density, and environmental sustainability. Special attention will be paid to the upcoming MoMA exhibition Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal and recent acquisitions from the Frank Lloyd Foundation through gallery visits and the hands-on study of archival materials.

Jennifer Gray (PhD, Columbia University) is a historian of modern art and architecture, specializing in the relationships between social politics and the built environment. Her work has been published in Future Anterior, Il Giornale Dell 'Architettura, and SmartPlanet. She is adjunct assistant professor at Columbia University and a lecturer at MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Thursdays

Sessions

6

Time

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Schedule
3/24, 3/31, 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 5/5 (No Class 4/28)
Non Member

$450

Member and Corporate Member employees

$400

Sound Amplification Available
Theliberator_hero-s

Design and Violence: Three Debates

Starts March 27
3 Thursdays
Instructor: Paola Antonelli and Jamer Hunt with special guests

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Theliberator_hero

Debate I

Moderated by Design and Violence co-curator Paola Antonelli, the first debate centers upon The Liberator, the world’s first 3-D printed gun. The gun’s designer Cody Wilson and author and journalist Rob Walker, (Yahoo Tech, The New York Times, Design Observer, Slate) will deliver debate motions, after which will follow a discussion focused on open-source design, the limits of gun laws and rights, and our assumptions about the ethics of design.

Debate II

The second debate focuses on the Menstruation Machine (2010), designed by Sputniko! (aka Hiromi Ozaki) to allow its wearer to experience the pain and tribulation of menstruation, regardless of his or her age or gender. Chris Bobel (author, New Blood: Third-wave Feminism and the Politics of Menstruation) and Mickey Boardman, (Editorial Director, Paper magazine) will deliver debate motions, moderated by Jamer Hunt.

Debate III

The third debate will center upon Temple Grandin’s “serpentine ramp,” a slaughterhouse design modification that attempts stress reduction and a more humane death for animals. Professor Gary L. Francione (Distinguished Professor of Law, Rutgers, and author, Eat Like You Care: An Examination of the Morality of Eating Animals) and Nicola Twilley (editor/author of Edible Geography.com, co-founder of the Foodprint Project, and director of Studio-X NYC) will deliver debate motions, moderated by Design and Violence co-curator Paola Antonelli.

Design and Violence is an ongoing online curatorial experiment that explores the manifestations of violence in contemporary society by pairing critical thinkers with examples of challenging design work. Contributors' weekly essays have been published since November 2013, creating a body of opinion and a set of case studies that spark discussion and bring the ambiguous relationship between design and violence to center stage for designers and the people they serve—all of us.

Design and Violence is organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA; Jamer Hunt, Director, graduate program in Transdisciplinary Design, Parsons The New School for Design; and Michelle Millar Fisher, Exhibition Coordinator, Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA.

Paola Antonelli’s work investigates design’s influence on everyday experience, often including overlooked objects and practices, and combining design, architecture, art, science, and technology. In addition to her role as senior curator of Architecture and Design at MoMA, Paola was appointed director of a new Research and Development initiative in 2012. She lectures frequently at global conferences and coordinates cultural discussions at the World Economic Forum in Davos.

Jamer Hunt collaboratively designs open and flexible programs that respond to emergent cultural conditions. He is the director of the graduate program in Transdisciplinary Design at Parsons The New School for Design and Visiting Design Researcher at the Institute of Design in Umeå, Sweden. His practice, Big + Tall Design, combines conceptual, collaborative, and communication design, and he is co-founder of DesignPhiladelphia, now the largest city-based design festival in the U.S.

Register Online
Day

Thursdays

Sessions

3

Time

6:30–8:00 p.m.

Schedule
3/27, 4/10, 4/17 (No class 4/3)
Non Member

$75

Member and Corporate Member employees

$55

Sound Amplification Available
Cezannestilllifewithapples-s

Introduction to Modern Art

SOLD OUT

Starts March 31
5 Mondays
Instructor: Heather Cotter

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Cezannestilllifewithapples

This course introduces students to the key works and ideas of modern art, from late Impressionism to Surrealism. Moving chronologically through the Museum's collection, students encounter an array of renowned and provocative works of art and examine paintings and sculptures that revolutionized the conventions of representation. Artists covered in the course include Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Marcel Duchamp, Constantin Brancusi, and many others.

Heather Cotter (MA, Boston University, and MEd with a specialization in art education, Harvard University) is a lecturer at The Museum of Modern Art.

Day

Mondays

Sessions

5

Time

6:30-8:30 p.m.

Schedule
3/31, 4/7, 4/14, 4/21, 4/28
Non Member

$400

Member and Corporate Member employees

$350

Sound Amplification Available
Pacocao-s

Paco Cao: Psychological Cocktail Services—Theory and Practice

SOLD OUT

April 3
1 Thursday
Instructor: Paco Cao

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Pacocao

Learn to create cocktails based on MoMA’s collection. Artist and expert psychological cocktail maker Paco Cao leads a workshop comprised of four primary components. First, a guided tour of avant-garde masterpieces in MoMA’s galleries highlights the importance of bars and drinks for the avant-garde. Second, workshop participants are introduced to the process involved in the making of psychological cocktails, which inverts the way we usually consume cocktails. Instead of selecting drinks from a predetermined menu, the client fills out a questionnaire and, according to their answers, the artist creates a personalized recipe for each client. Third, workshop participants are invited to actively collaborate with the artist in the design of a MoMA-specific questionnaire based on the Museum’s collection, uncovering the symbolic and psychological power of those works of art. Finally, the class culminates in a celebratory, hedonistic event held at MoMA's Terrace 5, during which Dr. Cao will provide psychological cocktail services for the enjoyment of the participants.

Paco Cao is unfaithful to any particular medium. Employing a wide range of disciplines and materials, his work establishes a strong relationship between art, audience, and context as it challenges the boundaries between high and low culture. His work has been shown at and/or made in collaboration with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, El Museo del Barrio, Creative Time, and the New Museum in New York City, as well as El Prado Museum (Madrid, Spain), MART (Rovereto, Italy), BOZAR (Brusells, Belgium), MUSAC (León, Spain), and MNCARS (Madrid, Spain). Cao holds a PhD in art history from the University of Oviedo, Spain.

Day

Thursday

Sessions

1

Time

6:30-9:30 p.m.

Schedule
4/3
Non Member

$150

Light refreshments included
Member and Corporate Member employees

$100

Light refreshments included
Sound Amplification Available