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MoMA

MoMA CLASSES

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The People’s Art Center

A central part of MoMA's program from 1948 to 1961, The People’s Art Center was conceived as an incubator for critical thinking, art making, and creativity. It's this mission that drives what we do today, and that inspired our new series of programs.

Immerse yourself in ideas and opportunities to see your world in new ways through art. Classes, artist-led immersions, and experiences can help you develop new perspectives and become a part of a community of learners unlike any other. In our studios and galleries, you can co-create artworks with MoMA’s artists; on the streets of Midtown, explore the neighborhood with our experts; and dive deep into new concepts and new conversations with innovators and visionaries.

If you can’t make it to MoMA, we also offer both instructor-led and self-guided MoMA Courses Online. Learn more about MoMA Courses Online.


Modern Art and Ideas

“Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences.”—Brian Eno

Explore various periods of modern and contemporary art through programs led by MoMA curators and other prominent experts, both inside and outside MoMA’s galleries.


Garden-t

From Modern to Contemporary: MoMA’s Sculpture Garden (daytime)

Starts June 30
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Joan Pachner

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Garden

Explore MoMA’s Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden. This summer, the Sculpture Garden features special installations from artists Yoko Ono and Pierre Huyghe, presented alongside works by such iconic modernist masters as Joan Miró and Aristide Maillol. Looking at these works together, the class explores the history of modernist sculpture in the Sculpture Garden while examining contemporary works that challenge expectations and ideas about sculpture today.

Joan Pachner (PhD New York University, Institute of Fine Arts) specializes in modern sculpture, and for the past 10 years she has lectured regularly at MoMA. She published a monograph on David Smith (Phaidon, 2013) and was a curatorial consultant and catalogue coauthor for Tony Smith: Architect, Painter, Sculpture (MoMA, 1988); she is currently working on a catalogue raisonné of Tony Smith's sculpture. In addition, she was a curatorial consultant at the Storm King Art Center (1996–2005). Pachner has published and lectured on other important 20th-century sculptors, including Anthony Caro, Gaston Lachaise, Jose de Rivera, and George Segal.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
6/30, 7/7, 7/14, 7/21
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$150

Sound Amplification Available
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Sparking Modernism: From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires (daytime)

Starts July 1
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: David Smucker

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Sterncoppola

This course focuses on MoMA’s exhibition of Argentine avant-garde art, From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires: Grete Stern and Horacio Coppola. Stern and Coppola’s interest in the artistic potential of photography brought them to the Bauhaus, where they were part of its radical developments. In 1933 the couple fled Nazi Germany to Buenos Aires, sparking the development of an Argentine modernism in photography and graphic design. Class sessions trace the background of historical avant-gardes in Europe through MoMA’s collection. Like their modernist contemporaries, Stern and Coppola were committed to art that engaged with the turbulent reality of modern life. We will see how their work modified the mission of the Bauhaus to suit their own personal, professional, and political needs in Argentina.

David Smucker is a PhD candidate in art history and criticism at Stony Brook University. His research focuses on contemporary art and the history of photography, and his in-progress dissertation examines photography’s relationship to car travel and the American road trip.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
7/1, 7/8, 7/15, 7/22
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$150

Sound Amplification Available
Yoko-t

Yoko Ono: The First Decade

Starts July 1
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Francesca Wilmott

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Yoko

Artist, musician, performer, poet, thinker, and activist—for over 50 years, Yoko Ono has defied categorization. John Lennon once called Ono “the world's most famous unknown artist.” “Everyone knows her name,” he explained, “but no one knows what she actually does.” On the occasion of the exhibition Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960–1971, this course examines the extraordinary foresight of Ono’s early work, which has continued to remain under-recognized. From 1960 to 1971, Ono moved between New York, Tokyo, and London, serving as a critical link within the international avant-garde. She created paintings, sculptures, works on paper, installations, films, and music that radically questioned the division between art and the everyday, often asking viewers to participate in the completion of her artwork. This course provides an in-depth investigation of Ono’s early work, contextualizing it within the broader artistic, social, and political moments of the 1960s and early 1970s. Students explore the curatorial process while studying and interacting with Ono’s work in the exhibition.

Francesca Wilmott (dual MA, School of the Art Institute of Chicago) is a curatorial assistant in MoMA's Department of Drawings and Prints. She worked on the exhibition Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960–1971 with Christophe Cherix and Klaus Biesenbach. Francesca previously assisted with the exhibition There Will Never Be Silence: Scoring John Cage’s 4'33" and is currently working with Christophe Cherix on the forthcoming Marcel Broodthaers retrospective. She has led gallery talks and tours at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; The Art Institute of Chicago; The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, St. Louis; and the Saint Louis Art Museum.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
7/1, 7/8 , 7/15, 7/29 (No Class 7/22)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$150

Sound Amplification Available
Gandg-t

(Re)inventing Contemporary: Reflecting Today

Starts July 1
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Mark Tursi

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“We believe very much that art is about re-inventing life. How we walk, how we speak, how we behave, how we look at things. That is art.” So says, Gilbert Prousch, one half of the artist duo Gilbert & George , in an interview with the Journal of Contemporary Art. This impulse to conflate the boundary between art and life—and even invent it as wholly new—has been at the forefront of contemporary art practice.

Starting with the exhibition Gilbert & George: The Early Years, this class explores notions of identity and subversion as reflected through the duo's work. To frame Gilbert & George’s early period, the class considers works by Kara Walker, David Maljkovic, Takashi Murakami, Nalini Malani, Cai Guo-Qiang, and Alfredo Jaar in the exhibition Scenes for a New Heritage: Contemporary Art from the Collection, along with works by Gilbert & George’s early contemporaries Robert Rauschenberg and Roy Lichtenstein in MoMA’s collection. The class places a special focus on the way in which cultural circumstances, individual identities, and contemporary political and social milieus collide with and often subvert history, tradition, and myths.

Mark Tursi has taught courses at MoMA on the sublime, Abstract Expressionism, Realism, Surrealism, and the artistic interchange between poets and painters. He is a professor of writing and literature at New Jersey City University, is the author of three collections of poetry, and is a founding editor of Apostrophe Books and the literary and visual arts journal Double Room.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
7/1, 7/8 , 7/15, 7/22
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$150

Sound Amplification Available
Jl-t

Migration as Cultural Catalyst: Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series and Beyond

Starts July 14
3 Tuesdays
Instructor: Jodi Roberts

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In 1941, at just 23 years old, Jacob Lawrence completed his best-known work, a series of 60 small paintings and captions about the Great Migration, the multi-decade mass movement of African Americans from the rural South the urban North that started around 1915. Lawrence’s concern with the Migration’s impact on American economies, politics, and culture was shared with contemporary artists working in a wide variety of art forms, including photography, music, fiction, poetry, and graphic illustration. MoMA’s current exhibition One-Way Ticket: Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series and Other Visions of the Great Movement North features artistic responses to this transformative event in American history by writers such as Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, and Richard Wright; the musicians Josh White, Duke Ellington, and Billie Holiday; photographers Dorothea Lange, Ben Shahn, Gordon Parks, and Robert McNeill; and painters including Charles Alston, Romare Bearden, and Charles White, among many others. This class delves into the works on view in One-Way Ticket and investigates the ways in which Lawrence and his contemporaries created new models for representing black experience in America. We also examine more recent works in MoMA’s collection that likewise demonstrate how migration can serve as a powerful impetus to creative activity and artistic innovation.

Jodi Roberts is a curatorial assistant in MoMA's Department of Painting and Sculpture. Most recently, she has worked on the exhibition One-Way Ticket: Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series and Other Visions of the Great Movement North. Roberts is also a PhD candidate at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. She has published work on Lawrence, Diego Rivera, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Alexander Calder, Horacio Coppola, and Grete Stern.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

3

Time

7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
7/14, 7/21, 7/28
Non Member

$265

Member and Corporate Member employees

$230

Student/Educator

$100

Sound Amplification Available
Studio Immersions

Make art in collaboration with contemporary artists.


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The Modern Studio: Cubism

Starts Tuesday April 14
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Corey D’Augustine

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This course explores the invention and development of Cubism using an interdisciplinary approach that blends elements of studio art, visual analysis, art history, and art conservation. Students gain an appreciation for Cubism from the perspective of the artist, first by examining the historical roots of the movement in slide lectures and in the MoMA galleries, and then by learning to draw and paint a variety of Cubist compositions in the studio. Emphasis will be placed on Cubism’s radical break with the pictorial space of traditional painting, and on its vital implications in the advent of collage and abstraction. Artists examined include Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Marcel Duchamp, and artists associated with the Italian and Russian Futurist movements. No previous painting experience is necessary.

Corey D'Augustine is a painting conservator, a professor of art history, and an artist.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
4/14, 4/21, 4/28, 5/5
Non Member

$450

Member and Corporate Member employees

$400

Student/Educator:

$250

Sound Amplification Available
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Mind Games: Exploring Play in Creative Practice

SOLD OUT

May 2
1 Saturday
Instructor: Stina Puotinen

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Where do “good” ideas come from? How can artistic collaboration help to break through periods of creative block? This session will trace how artists, from the Dadaists and Surrealists of the early 20th century through today, have experimented with playful, collaborative exercises to spark inspiration. Participants have the opportunity to discuss work on view from MoMA's collection through this lens before using a series of creative prompts to explore firsthand some of the same tricks, games, and rituals that artists have used over time. Throughout the day, participants will learn methods for overcoming creative block and will have the opportunity to deepen their own practices by expanding their ideas of what art can be. Join this session to get inspired by new experiences, new materials, and new people!

Stina Puotinen received her BA in art history and studio art at Vassar College and has been working as an artist, museum educator, and occasional curator in New York City for the past 10 years. She currently teaches at several leading arts institutions, including MoMA, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Art and Design, and the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum. Born out of her work in Museums, both literally and ideologically, was her previous work as co-founder of the video and performance collective CHERYL and founding member of the curatorial production team Limited Time Only. She lives and works in Brooklyn.

Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

1:00–4:00 p.m.

Schedule
5/2
Non Member

$50

Member and Corporate Member employees

$35

Student/Educator:

$30

Sound Amplification Available
After Hours

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MoMA After Hours: Making Music Modern

March 19
1 Thursday
Instructor: Marianne Eggler

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What do Arnold Schӧenberg and the Talking Heads have in common? The dynamic intersection of music and the visual arts. In the early 20th century, the fruitful interplay between music and visual art contributed to the move toward abstraction in fine art painting and commercial art. This dialogue across disciplines reemerged in the album covers of the new wave. Join us for an evening of modern design, music, and mayhem as we raise a glass to our favorite bands and album covers of the later twentieth century.

Join us for an evening of modern design, music, and mayhem as we raise a glass to our favorite bands and album covers and explore the current exhibition Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye. This MoMA After Hours event includes a visit to the exhibition followed by a discussion and a visit to the downtown music haunt Pianos for a nightcap. Refreshments will be served throughout the evening.

Please note: you must be 21 years or older to register for this class.

This class is also offered on Thursday, March 22

Marianne Eggler is an art, architecture, and design historian who has served as a MoMA lecturer since 1998. A native New Yorker, she holds a BA in art history from the University of Rochester and did her doctoral studies at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is completing her dissertation on Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich's modern domestic interiors. She has lectured both here and abroad on the subject of modern art and design and has taught extensively, both for MoMA courses and at various other institutions, including Parsons The New School for Design, CUNY, and SUNY Buffalo State. She is currently an adjunct assistant professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

1

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
3/19
Non Member

$100

Refreshments included

Member and Corporate Member employees

$80

Refreshments included

Student/Educator

$60

Refreshments included

Sound Amplification Available
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MoMA After Hours: Making Music Modern

April 22
1 Wednesday
Instructor: Marianne Eggler

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What do Arnold Schӧenberg and the Talking Heads have in common? The dynamic intersection of music and the visual arts. In the early 20th century, the fruitful interplay between music and visual art contributed to the move toward abstraction in fine art painting and commercial art. This dialogue across disciplines reemerged in the album covers of the later twentieth century.

Join us for an evening of modern design, music, and mayhem as we raise a glass to our favorite bands and album covers and explore the current exhibition Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye. This MoMA After Hours event includes a visit to the exhibition followed by a discussion and a visit to a downtown music haunt for a nightcap. Refreshments will be served throughout the evening.

Please note: you must be 21 years or older to register for this class.

This class is also offered on Thursday, March 19

Marianne Eggler is an art, architecture, and design historian who has served as a MoMA lecturer since 1998. A native New Yorker, she holds a BA in art history from the University of Rochester and did her doctoral studies at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is completing her dissertation on Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich's modern domestic interiors. She has lectured both here and abroad on the subject of modern art and design and has taught extensively, both for MoMA courses and at various other institutions, including Parsons The New School for Design, CUNY, and SUNY Buffalo State. She is currently an adjunct assistant professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

1

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
4/22
Non Member

$100

Refreshments included

Member and Corporate Member employees

$80

Refreshments included

Student/Educator

$60

Refreshments included

Sound Amplification Available
Artist-Led

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Painting with Sound: An Introduction to Audio Reactive Programming

SOLD OUT

Starts March 28
1 Saturday, 1 Sunday
Instructor: Joshua Davis

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Join artist Joshua Davis for a two-day workshop in creating visualizations of sound. Students will use JAVA+HYPE software to paint objects onscreen and then expose them to a range of audio input. By assigning a range of form and color to the deepest bass and the highest tweets, the students will create art that responds to the invisible audio world that surrounds us. This program is open to all levels and no prior skills are required.

Joshua Davis is an American designer, technologist, author, and artist. Over his 19-year career as an image maker using programming, Davis has written his own code to produce interactions with users and generate visual compositions according to rule-based, randomized processes. Davis had a role in designing the visualization of IBM’s Watson, the intelligent computer program capable of answering questions, for the quiz show Jeopardy. His work ​is in the collection of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum​, and was exhibited in Design Life Now, the​ National Design Triennial 2006.

Day

Saturday, Sunday

Sessions

2

Time

1:00–5:00 p.m.

Schedule
3/28, 3/29
Non Member

$75

Member and Corporate Member employees

$50

Student/Educator

$40

Sound Amplification Available
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Pocket Storytelling: Building a Photo Story out of a Smartphone

SOLD OUT

April 11
1 Saturday
Instructor: Jorge Colombo

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If we think of images as words, then selecting and sequencing the right ones can amplify their power. Properly strung together, they can become a story, a poem, or a question. The smartphones most of us carry in our pockets allow us to assemble and disseminate visual messages in a quick and effective way. But our main tools are not in our cameras or apps; they're in our minds. This class explores the legwork, contemplation, and experimentation necessary to locate unpredictable bits of our environment as the basis for storytelling. Join artist Jorge Colombo for a creative day of shooting your own images inside and outside MoMA; discussing how other photographers create narratives in their work; and selecting, creating, and sharing your own photo story. Each participant has the opportunity to post his or her final narrative online. The program is open to all levels, and no prior skills are required. Participants are asked to bring a smartphone.

Jorge Colombo has worked as an editorial illustrator, as a photographer, and as a graphic designer. He was born in Lisbon, Portugal, and has lived in the U.S. since 1989. For the past six years virtually all of his output—paintings and photographs—has been created with either an iPhone or an iPad.

Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

10:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Schedule
4/11
Non Member

$60

Member and Corporate Member employees

$45

Student/Educator

$35

Sound Amplification Available
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Uncovering Deep Time in Midtown: A Walking Tour

SOLD OUT

April 25
1 Saturday
Instructors: smudge studio

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Spend an afternoon on a New York City walking tour with the artist collaborative smudge studio (Elizabeth Ellsworth and Jamie Kruse). While much of this city’s architecture and infrastructure depends upon geologic materials that took millennia to form, most humans have little cultural awareness of this reality today. During this walk, participants are invited to experience and consider for themselves the geologic forces and flows that give form and foundation to New York City. After considering the geologic materials embedded within everyday life here, we will consider deep futures in the making and how city dwellers might inhabit and creatively navigate current planetary changes. The walk pauses at three sites where participants will be invited to conduct on-site research through sketching and by accessing relevant information on their mobile phones. At each stop, smudge studio will offer a provocation to use art and design as "aesthetic prostheses" for considering New York City as an aperture onto deep time. The walk covers a distance of approximately two miles and includes visits to Central Park and Rockefeller Center. Each participant will receive a complimentary copy of smudge studio's Geologic City: A Field Guide to the GeoArchitecture of New York (2012).

Elizabeth Ellsworth is an artist and a professor of media studies at The New School. She teaches courses in media and change, and she has published several books on mediated learning environments. She is also a member of the Atomic Photographers Guild.

Jamie Kruse is an artist, designer, and part-time faculty member in the School for Design Strategies at Parsons The New School for Design. Her work has been supported by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts; the New York State Council for the Arts (2010, 2011) and the Brooklyn Arts Council, among others. In the spring of 2014 she was a guest researcher for Future North (AHO Oslo). She is the author of the Friends of the Pleistocene blog.

Ellsworth and Kruse are codirectors of smudge studio, an art collaborative founded in 2005. Their process involves performative field research, practice as aesthetic response, and public pedagogy. smudge studio’s current work attempts to translate abstract and complex ideas regarding planetary change into aesthetic provocations and "embodied practices." These activities invite audiences into intentional and meaningful coexistence with contemporary forces and the scales of change (both natural and human-made).

Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

2:00–4:30 p.m.

Schedule
4/25 (Rain Date: 4/26)
Non Member

$60

Member and Corporate Member employees

$45

Student/Educator

$35

Sound Amplification Available
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Dress Codes: Wearing the Sounds of Björk

May 21
1 Thursday
Instructor: Emily Spivack

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With every new Björk album comes the invention of an entirely new character, a new sound, and a new look. Each transformation seems entirely specific to Björk, but what if her personae gave rise to others? Join artist and writer Emily Spivack to assess Björk’s signature reinventions and study how and why they’ve been copied, appropriated, and collaged. Inspired by Spivack’s previous work with WikiHow and DIS, and her forthcoming "How to Dress Like" Web project, this workshop prompts participants to look at and listen to Björk’s character and musical transformations, break down the elements of her aesthetics and dress, and write shape-shifting, how-to-dress-like instructions.

Emily Spivack is an artist, writer, and editor whose work draws from contemporary culture, fashion, and history. Emily launched Worn Stories, a collection of stories she edits from cultural figures and talented storytellers about clothing and memory, in 2010. A New York Times Best Seller, Worn Stories was published by Princeton Architectural Press in 2014. Emily has spent six years collecting stories about clothing from eBay posts for a website she curates, Sentimental Value, and she has exhibited the Internet found-art project in Philadelphia, Brooklyn, and Portland. Emily is the creator and writer of the Smithsonian’s fashion history blog, Threaded, drawing from the institution’s vast collection and beyond. Emily's work has been featured in The New York Times, New York Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post, among other publications.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

1

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
5/21
Non Member

$60

Member and Corporate Member employees

$45

Student/Educator

$35

Sound Amplification Available
Frequently Asked Questions


Payment

We accept all major credit cards. To register and pay visit the online registration system.

Discount

Students, educators (K–12, college, and university), and staff of other museums receive a discount on the member rate. Student or staff identification must be presented upon check-in on the first day of class.

Refunds

In order to receive a full refund, notice of cancellation must be sent in writing via e-mail, letter, or fax at least one week before the first scheduled day of class. Payment will not be refunded after this time. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.


If I drop the class can I get a refund?
You will only receive a refund if you cancel your registration at least one week before the first day of class. You may do this by accessing your online registration and clicking the "Modify" tab. You will be able to unregister yourself from a class and receive a full refund. You may also cancel your registration by phone or e-mail. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.

Can I get a refund after the second or third class?
MoMA is unable to grant refunds after the refund period.

If I miss a class can I receive a refund or a make up classes with the instructor?
No. MoMA provides course schedules in advance to provide perspective students the opportunity to plan ahead and make necessary arrangements to attend classes. Students will receive a syllabus and course reader in advance to help themselves prepare for missing class.

Can I take a MoMA Class for credit?
No. MoMA Classes are not accredited. If you wish to receive credit for a MoMA Class, you must organize this with your institution.

How do I register?
To register for online courses, use the online registration system.

Do I have to register online?
Yes. If you have any difficulties using the online registration system, please call (212) 408-8441.

How do I know if a class is full?
If a class is full the website will indicate that the course is sold out. Please note that updates to class availability are made during business hours and courses may fill up overnight or over the weekend. You will know a course is sold out when you attempt to register and the only option you are given is to add your name to the waiting list.

Can I be put on a waiting list for a class that is filled?
Yes. The online registration form includes a waiting list option for sold-out classes. You must fill out the online registration form to be added to the waiting list. Once you complete the registration, you will receive an e-mail confirming that you have been added to the waiting list.

What if I am a member of the Museum?
As a member at the individual level or higher you will receive the members rate. We honor a first-come, first-served policy for class registration regardless of your member status.

How do I sign up for a membership?
If you are not a member and would like to sign up for membership, simply visit the Membership page. If you have any questions about membership, please call Membership Services at (212) 708-9475.

Are Corporate Member employees eligible to receive the member discount?
Yes. A copy of your valid company ID must be faxed or e-mailed to the Corporate Membership Department in order to receive the discounted price.

Will the class have access to the galleries?
When possible, as determined by your instructor and MoMA, students will have the unique privilege to view MoMA's collection in the galleries after hours, during class time.

Will these specific courses be offered again?
Yes and no. There are some courses that will be offered regularly, for example Modern Art 1880–1945 and Modern and Contemporary Art 1945–Present. Some classes may be offered again depending on the instructor's availability, scheduling, and student interest. MoMA cannot guarantee if or when certain classes will be offered again.

If I miss a class and there is another section of the same class being offered on a different day, can I attend the other section of the same course?
No. Each course instructor utilizes a different syllabus. Although there are two sections of the same class offered, the material covered would not necessarily correspond.

Can I register my friend?
Yes. Once you have entered your personal information and selected a class in the online registration form, click the "Add Person" button. Fill out the registration form for this person and be sure to use a separate e-mail address for him or her. Our registration system will not accept multiple registrants with the same e-mail address. Your registration is complete after you have filled out all the required information for both you and your friend and submitted payment. Please note that you will each receive an e-mail confirming your individual registration. Your confirmation e-mail will NOT include a record of your friend's registration information.

Can I bring a friend or family member to attend one of my class sessions so they can experience the program?
No. Though we welcome interest in MoMA Classes, we cannot accommodate guests.


Policies

MoMA reserves the right to cancel or withdraw classes, to change class curricula and scheduling, and to withdraw and substitute instructors.

If an instructor needs to cancel an individual class, we will notify you via phone or e-mail and that class will be made up at a later date.

Students accept full responsibility for personal injury and/or losses suffered during class hours and while on museum premises.

MoMA will not release course participants’ personal information to any persons or organizations outside of the Museum without prior written consent.

Past Classes

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Taking the Matter in Hand: Sigmar Polke, 1963–2010

Starts April 22
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Ágnes Berecz

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Was Sigmar Polke “just a little bit too much for everybody,” as John Baldessari stated a few years ago? How can we approach a body of work that has been routinely described as polyphonic, masterly, willfully pathetic, and alchemistic, and that defied all established boundaries of art in the late 20th century with momentous irreverence? By exploring MoMA's Polke retrospective, this short course provides a comprehensive examination of the artist’s paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, films, performances, and photo works from the early 1960s to 2010.

Ágnes Berecz (PhD, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) teaches modern and contemporary art history at the Pratt Institute and in the School of Graduate Studies of the Fashion Institute of Technology. Her writings have been published in Art in America, Artmargins, and Praesens, and in European and U.S. exhibition catalogues.

Register Online
Day

Tuesdays

Sessions

4

Time

7:30–9:30 p.m.

Schedule
4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/20 (No class 5/13)
Non Member

$350

Member and Corporate Member employees

$300

Sound Amplification Available