A-|A+

MoMA

MoMA CLASSES

Img_1295

The People’s Art Center

A central part of MoMA's program from 1948 to 1961, The People’s Art Center was conceived as an incubator for critical thinking, art making, and creativity. It's this mission that drives what we do today, and that inspired our new fall series of programs.

Immerse yourself in ideas and opportunities to see your world in new ways through art. Classes, artist-led immersions, and experiences can help you develop new perspectives and become a part of a community of learners unlike any other. In our studios and galleries, you can co-create artworks with MoMA’s artists; on the streets of Midtown, explore the neighborhood with our experts; and dive deep into new concepts and new conversations with innovators and visionaries.

If you can’t make it to MoMA, we also offer both instructor-led and self-guided MoMA Courses Online. Learn more about MoMA Courses Online.


Modern Art and Ideas

“Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences.”—Brian Eno

Explore various periods of modern and contemporary art through programs led by MoMA curators and other prominent experts, both inside and outside MoMA’s galleries.


Williams_fig_2-s

Contemporary Art in Context (Daytime)

Starts September 29
4 Mondays
Instructor: David Smucker

View detail
Close
Williams_fig_2

What do sculptures of kitchen sinks or excised slabs of a museum’s walls have to do with art? Some artistic choices seem indecipherable at first glance, but close consideration can reveal that these objects are deeply invested with meaning. A major focus of this course is the exhibitions Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness and Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor. The Museum’s collection provides an in-depth context that will ground our understanding of these two contemporary artists and uncover how they both engage with art and its history. Christopher Williams’s photographs and architectural interventions regularly allude to modernist art and Cold War politics in order to critically re-imagine these official histories. Putting Robert Gober’s painstakingly handmade sculptures of domestic objects in dialogue with canonical 20th-century artworks can create a jumping-off point for understanding how his elusive works operate as personal expression and attempts to redefine what art can be. Class discussions in the Museum’s galleries will examine how an artist’s attention to materials and craftsmanship, to the specific placement of works within a gallery space, and to domestic, artistic, and cultural histories can generate meanings that expand well beyond the object immediately at hand.

Can’t make a daytime session? This class is also offered on Mondays evenings from 6:00 to 7:50 p.m.

David Smucker is a PhD candidate in art history and criticism at Stony Brook University. His research focuses on contemporary art and the history of photography, and his in-progress dissertation examines photography’s relationship to car travel and the American road trip.

Register Online
Day

Mondays

Sessions

4

Time

10:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Schedule
9/29, 10/6, 10/20, 10/27 (No Class 10/13)
Non Member

$290

Member and Corporate Member employees

$265

Student/Educator

$235

Sound Amplification Available
Williams_fig_2-s

Contemporary Art in Context

Starts September 29
4 Mondays
Instructor: David Smucker

View detail
Close
Williams_fig_2

What do sculptures of kitchen sinks or excised slabs of a museum’s walls have to do with art? Some artistic choices seem indecipherable at first glance, but close consideration can reveal that these objects are deeply invested with meaning. A major focus of this course is the exhibitions Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness and Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor. The Museum’s collection provides an in-depth context that will ground our understanding of these two contemporary artists and uncover how they both engage with art and its history. Christopher Williams’s photographs and architectural interventions regularly allude to modernist art and Cold War politics in order to critically re-imagine these official histories. Putting Robert Gober’s painstakingly handmade sculptures of domestic objects in dialogue with canonical 20th-century artworks can create a jumping-off point for understanding how his elusive works operate as personal expression and attempts to redefine what art can be. Class discussions in the Museum’s galleries will examine how an artist’s attention to materials and craftsmanship, to the specific placement of works within a gallery space, and to domestic, artistic, and cultural histories can generate meanings that expand well beyond the object immediately at hand.

Can’t make an evening class? This class is also offered Mondays from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

David Smucker is a PhD candidate in art history and criticism at Stony Brook University. His research focuses on contemporary art and the history of photography, and his in-progress dissertation examines photography’s relationship to car travel and the American road trip.

Register Online
Day

Mondays

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
9/29, 10/6, 10/20, 10/27 (No Class 10/13)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$248

Sound Amplification Available
Lai_white_elephant-s

Contemporary Architecture Discourses

Starts September 29
4 Mondays
Instructor: Jennifer Gray

View detail
Close
Lai_white_elephant

This course explores critical questions and cultural shifts in contemporary architecture and design practices. Since the 1990s, new developments in digital and mobile technologies, together with a global market economy, have transformed our experience and perception of the built environment. Architects and designers use computer modeling to build expressive and creative structures that were once unimaginable, and they pioneer social and critical practices that respond to worldwide humanitarian crises. The gaming industry constructs interactive, realistic virtual environments that allow users to occupy digital space, while graphic designers employ new cartographic strategies to spatially map the intangible and instantaneous interactions of the Internet. This course is a laboratory for the investigation of these and other topics relevant to contemporary design practices, including virtual realities, conceptual design, critical curatorial and preservation practices, celebrity architects, architourism, “ruinophilia,” tactical urbanisms, and social practice. Special attention will be paid to the exhibitions Conceptions of Space: Recent Acquisitions in Contemporary Architecture and A Collection of Ideas, and the online initiative Design and Violence.

Jennifer Gray (PhD, Columbia University) is a historian of modern art and architecture, specializing in the relationships between social politics and the built environment. Her work has been published in Future Anterior, Il Giornale Dell 'Architettura, and SmartPlanet. She is an adjunct assistant professor at Columbia University and a lecturer at MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Mondays

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
9/29, 10/6, 10/20, 10/27 (No Class 10/13)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$248

Sound Amplification Available
Matisse_dance-s

Henri Matisse: The Fertile Environment of the Artist’s Studio

Starts September 30
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

View detail
Close
Matisse_dance

This is the first in a two-part course examining the work of Henri Matisse. Inspired by the exhibition Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs, the course explores the reinvigorated latter part of Matisse’s life, as the artist became ever more exuberantly engaged with the process and possibilities of “carving in color.” Together we will contextualize and trace the evolution of the artist’s working methods from the 1930s on by looking at a number of major projects and related studies, from stage set designs for the ballet and the famous Barnes-commissioned mural, to the richly integrated site-specific components of the Vence Chapel (which the artist considered his masterpiece), to some of the large-scale installations suffusing Matisse’s apartment at the time of his death in 1954. Through our encounters with these and other works, we will consider the generative nature of the artist’s studio (and his studio practice) and uncover wonderful continuities—across multiple mediums—throughout a career that spanned over 60 years.

Larissa Bailiff has worked as an educator at MoMA since 2003. She helped to develop and currently teaches a MoMA online survey course covering the period between 1880 and 1945, and she has taught over 20 MoMA in-person class sections (12 original classes) since 2005. She has also taught two dozen art history courses at FIT, Pratt, and Marymount Manhattan College. She currently serves as the coordinator for the CCL/Mellon Foundation Seminar in Curatorial Practice.

Register Online
Day

Tuesdays

Sessions

4

Time

8:00–9:50 p.m.

Schedule
9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/28 (No Class 10/21)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$248

Sound Amplification Available
Duchamp_bicycle_wheel-s

Five Themes in Modern and Contemporary Art (Daytime)

Starts October 1
6 Wednesdays
Instructor: Heather Cotter

View detail
Close
Duchamp_bicycle_wheel

Over the last 100 years, modern and contemporary artists have connected and reconnected with a number of salient themes. Themes addressing questions of beauty, originality, value, and the experiential and conceptual nature of art have continually borne fruit for artists, serving to highlight connections between what appear to be very divergent art forms while encouraging audiences to explore the work from new perspectives. This class considers a new theme each week, and how different artists have approached it over the years. We will look at artists such as Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Robert Rauschenberg, Andy Warhol, and many others.

Heather Cotter (MA, Boston University, and MEd with a specialization in art education, Harvard University) is a lecturer at MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Wednesdays

Sessions

6

Time

10:30 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Schedule
10/1, 10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5
Non Member

$475

Member and Corporate Member employees

$425

Student/Educator

$383

Sound Amplification Available
Matisse_swimming_pool-s

Matisse’s Cut-Outs, Part I: From the Studio to the Environment (Daytime)

SOLD OUT

Starts October 7
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Deborah A. Goldberg

View detail
Close
Matisse_swimming_pool

This is the first in a two-part course examining the work of Henri Matisse on the occasion of the exhibition Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs. Matisse continues to fascinate us with his brilliant use of color, line, and extraordinary range. Beginning in the later 1940s, Matisse began the process of “drawing with scissors,” cutting painted paper to create jaunty compositions that were both representational and abstract. His first major cut-out project was his internationally acclaimed book Jazz (1947). This course provides a close study of Matisse’s cut-outs, linking them to his work in other mediums. We will focus especially on the development of his interest in the environment, and his movement beyond the limits of easel painting to work on a grander scale and make site-specific installations, such as the Vence Chapel (1948–51). Class discussion will incorporate new discoveries about the artist’s cut-out technique, studio practice, and the recent conservation of MoMA’s Swimming Pool through a visit to the Museum’s conservation studio.

Deborah A. Goldberg (PhD, the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University) teaches art history at the School of Visual Arts, lectures regularly at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and MoMA, and lectures on sculpture for the Christie’s Master’s Program. She designed an online art history course (Modern Art: 1880–1945) for MoMA, wrote the audio tour for the MoMA exhibition Gauguin: Metamorphoses (2014), wrote modern and contemporary audio stops for the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and wrote the adult audio tour for the 2012–13 MoMA collection exhibition Fast Forward: Modern Moments 1913–2013 at the High Museum in Atlanta. She co-edited and contributed a chapter to the book Alexander Archipenko Revisited: An International Perspective (Archipenko Foundation, 2008) and is currently writing books on Alexander Calder and the design career of Isamu Noguchi.

Day

Tuesdays

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$248

Sound Amplification Available
Kentridge_learning_the_flute-s

Curatorial Perspectives: Artistic Mediums in Dialogue

Starts October 9
4 Thursdays
Instructors: Masha Chlenova, Judith B. Hecker

View detail
Close
Kentridge_learning_the_flute

Much modern and contemporary art has been created through a dialogue between artistic mediums, with artists moving fluidly between drawing, printmaking, painting, film, poetry, and performance. Cross-media collaborations enabled such key breakthroughs as the invention of abstraction. How can museum presentations successfully reflect the close dialogue between artistic mediums in individual artists’ careers and across entire historical periods? How do artworks come together on a wall, in a gallery, or within a larger space to tell a story? What choices do curators make and how do those decisions affect the way we understand the work of an individual artist or an artistic movement? This class considers current collection gallery installations at MoMA, along with recent and current exhibitions, to explore curatorial perspectives on building narratives and connections between artists, artworks, and mediums. Exhibitions considered during the course include Inventing Abstraction, 1910–1925 (2012–13), William Kentridge: Five Themes (2010), Jasper Johns: Regrets (2014), and Jean Dubuffet: Soul of the Underground (2014).

Judith B. Hecker (MA, University of Chicago) is an assistant curator in MoMA’s Department of Drawings and Prints. She curated Impressions from South Africa, 1965 to Now: Prints from The Museum of Modern Art and co-curated MoMA’s presentation of William Kentridge: Five Themes. She has organized collection rotations for the Museum’s Prints and Illustrated Books Galleries and contributed to numerous collection catalogues. She also works on new acquisitions for the collection.

Masha Chlenova (PhD, Columbia University) is an art historian and curator specializing in early 20th-century art. Most recently she was a curatorial assistant in MoMA’s Department of Painting and Sculpture, where she worked on the exhibition Inventing Abstraction, 1910–1925 and an upcoming retrospective of Francis Picabia. Her writing has appeared in the journal October and in exhibition catalogues published by MoMA, the Guggenheim Museum, and Tate Modern.

Register Online
Day

Thursdays

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 11/6 (No Class 10/30)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$248

Sound Amplification Available
Williams_kodak-s

The Shape of Things

Starts October 9
4 Thursdays
Instructor: Ágnes Berecz

View detail
Close
Williams_kodak

How did Henri Matisse’s cut-outs, Christopher Williams’s photographic works, and Robert Gober’s objects and installations reinvent the traditions and rhetoric of image- and object-making? Through a series of close readings of individual works of art, The Shape of Things provides an understanding of newly constituted material practices, methodological devices, and the expanding field of media that characterized the cultural production of Western art in and after the second half of the 20th century.

Ágnes Berecz (PhD, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) teaches modern and contemporary art history at Christie's Education and the Pratt Institute. Her writings have been published in Art in America, Art Journal, Artmargins, and numerous European and U.S. exhibition catalogues.

Register Online
Day

Thursdays

Sessions

4

Time

8:00–9:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$248

Sound Amplification Available
Zeisel_folding_chair-s

Perspectives on Modernism

Starts October 21
6 Tuesdays
Instructors: Heather Cotter, Jennifer Gray

View detail
Close
Zeisel_folding_chair

What is modernism? Modernity is a vital mode of experience fed by broad cultural shifts, from unprecedented discoveries in the physical sciences, the industrialization of production, and rapid urbanization, to new systems of mass communication and transportation. To be modern is to embrace perpetual change, ambiguity, and contradiction.

This cross-disciplinary course explores modern painting, sculpture, collage, architecture, photography, and design through five critical lenses that attempt to frame some of the meanings of modernism: media/markets, science/technology, spirituality/ideology, avant-garde/publics, and revolution/fragmentation. Resisting chronological histories as a succession of “isms” or styles, students instead investigate modern visual culture in all its messy complexity. Discussions arc across various disciplines, movements, and eras, and focus on numerous exhibitions—including The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters, Designing Modern Women 1890–1990, A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio, Conceptions of Space: Recent Acquisitions in Contemporary Architecture, and Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs—and MoMA’s collection.

Jennifer Gray (PhD, Columbia University) is a historian of modern art and architecture, specializing in the relationships between social politics and the built environment. Her work has been published in Future Anterior, Il Giornale Dell 'Architettura, and SmartPlanet. She is an adjunct assistant professor at Columbia University and a lecturer at MoMA.

Heather Cotter (MA, Boston University, and MEd with a specialization in art education, Harvard University) is a lecturer at MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Tuesdays

Sessions

6

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/21, 10/28, 11/4, 11/11, 11/18, 12/2 (No Class 11/25)
Non Member

$475

Member and Corporate Member employees

$425

Student/Educator

$383

Sound Amplification Available
Lautrec_la_clownesse-s

Radical Interventions: Works on Paper from the Collection

Starts October 22
5 Wednesdays
Instructor: Jennifer Katanic

View detail
Close
Lautrec_la_clownesse

This course introduces students to a wide range of modern and contemporary artists who use printmaking, drawing, and mixed media installations to develop radical interventions into art and life. Issues of consumer culture, reproduction, copying, and appropriation undermine traditional value systems while creating new ways of seeing images within a socially and politically charged environment. The course will focus on a selection of case studies drawn from MoMA’s collection and the exhibitions The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters, Jean Dubuffet: Soul of the Underground, Sturtevant: Double Trouble, and Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor.

Jennifer Katanic (PhD candidate, The Graduate Center, City University of New York) is a specialist in postwar Central European art and culture. She is a lecturer in MoMA's Department of Education and works with International Art Guides as a contemporary art educator at Art Basel Miami Beach. She has taught art history at Rutgers University and City College, New York.

Register Online
Day

Wednesdays

Sessions

5

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19
Non Member

$400

(Materials included)

Member and Corporate Member employees

$360

(Materials included)

Student/Educator

$325

(Materials included)

Sound Amplification Available
Picasso_les_demoiselles-s

MoMA Highlights: Four Game-Changers—Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Robert Rauschenberg, Andy Warhol

Starts October 22
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Elisabeth Bardt-Pellerin

View detail
Close
Picasso_les_demoiselles

This course takes a close look at four artists who redefined and expanded the boundaries of what art could be. Each week we focus on one artist, with extensive exploration of how that artist’s experimental and conceptual approaches to art and process pushed the parameters of aesthetics in modern and postmodern movements. Students will spend time in MoMA's collection galleries as part of the class, and each student will receive a copy of the book MoMA Highlights: 350 Works from The Museum of Modern Art, New York as part of the class price.

Elisabeth Bardt-Pellerin (MA in art education, Concordia University, Montreal) is a frequent lecturer at MoMA and the Guggenheim Museum.

Register Online
Day

Wednesdays

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$248

Sound Amplification Available
Matisse_parakeet-s

Matisse and the Art of Making: The Cut-Out, Collage, and All That Jazz

Starts November 4
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

View detail
Close
Matisse_parakeet

This is the second in a two-part course examining the work of Henri Matisse on the occasion of the Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs exhibition. Giving major attention to Matisse’s highly-acclaimed book Jazz (1947) and a few of the other large-scale installations in the show, this course covers objects not previously treated in Part I. Our focus will shift to the broader context of artists innovating with paper in the modern era, as we consider some of the history of collage and artists’ book–making during the early to mid 20th century. During the last session, we will make our own cut-outs as a way of understanding the challenging technique—of creating contour and expression out of color—that Matisse made look so effortless. In addition to visiting the Cut-Outs exhibition and MoMA’s collection galleries, the class includes a visit to the Museum’s Prints and Drawings Study Center to see original works related to our topic.

Larissa Bailiff has worked as an educator at MoMA since 2003. She helped to develop and currently teaches a MoMA online survey course covering the period between 1880 and 1945, and she has taught over 20 MoMA in-person class sections (12 original classes) since 2005. She has also taught two dozen art history courses at FIT, Pratt, and Marymount Manhattan College. She currently serves as the coordinator for CCL/Mellon Foundation Seminar in Curatorial Practice.

Register Online
Day

Tuesdays

Sessions

4

Time

8:00–9:50 p.m.

Schedule
11/4, 11/11, 11/18, 12/2 (No Class 11/25)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$248

Sound Amplification Available
Matisse_memory_of_oceania-s

Matisse’s Cut-Outs, Part II: Collage and Process (Daytime)

Starts November 4
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Deborah A. Goldberg

View detail
Close
Matisse_memory_of_oceania

This is the second in a two-part course examining the work of Henri Matisse on the occasion of the exhibition Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs. This course looks at the history of collage prior to Matisse’s cut-outs, with a focus on the unique nature of Matisse’s technique of “drawing with scissors.” We will cover objects in the exhibition not treated in Part I of this class, such as Matisse’s book and periodical covers and his most ambitious large-scale compositions. Students study the cut-out process with a consideration of the artistic challenges that faced Matisse—simplifying forms, an attention to contour, balancing the abstract and the representational, and playing with the positive and negative—before experimenting with the technique themselves. The class will also make a behind-the-scenes visit to the Museum’s Drawings and Prints Study Center to look at Matisse’s and other artists’ work.

Deborah A. Goldberg (PhD, the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University) teaches art history at the School of Visual Arts, lectures regularly at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and MoMA, and lectures on sculpture for the Christie’s Master’s Program. She designed an online art history course (Modern Art: 1880–1945) for MoMA, wrote the audio tour for the MoMA exhibition Gauguin: Metamorphoses (2014), wrote modern and contemporary audio stops for the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and wrote the adult audio tour for the 2012–13 MoMA collection exhibition Fast Forward: Modern Moments 1913–2013 at the High Museum in Atlanta. She co-edited and contributed a chapter to the book Alexander Archipenko Revisited: An International Perspective (Archipenko Foundation, 2008) and is currently writing books on Alexander Calder and the design career of Isamu Noguchi.

Register Online
Day

Tuesdays

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
11/4, 11/11, 11/18, 12/2 (No Class 11/25)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$248

Sound Amplification Available
Sturtevant_warhol_flowers-s

Contemporary Art in Dialogue

Starts November 6
4 Thursdays
Instructor: Sophie Landres

View detail
Close
Sturtevant_warhol_flowers

This class explores the relationship between contemporary art and the language used to describe images, recount history, explain ideas, and interpret visual information. Focusing on the exhibition Sturtevant: Double Trouble, we will discuss the various ways artists, critics, and curators turn exhibitions into forums for public dialogue. In 1964, Elaine Sturtevant began copying artwork by artists such as Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, and Joseph Beuys. By examining her work along with that of the artists she appropriated, students will gain an understanding of how meaning can differ between seemingly identical forms. By reading gallery text, art reviews, and other exhibition material, we will also consider how writers attempt to make these meanings clear. Optional writing exercises give students the opportunity to develop their own responses to some of the most challenging questions posed in the postwar period.

Sophie Landres (PhD candidate, Stony Brook University) is a modern and contemporary art historian, specializing in post-WWII intermedia art. She holds a BA in political science from the University of Iowa and an MFA in art criticism and writing from the School of Visual Arts. Sophie previously worked as a curator, art critic, and director of contemporary art galleries. She currently teaches at the Sotheby’s Institute of Art, New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, and MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Thursdays

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 12/4 (No Class 11/27)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$248

Sound Amplification Available
Gober_untitled_1992-s

Robert Gober: The Metaphor Is in the Medium

Starts November 12
3 Wednesdays
Instructor: Kathryn Chiong

View detail
Close
Gober_untitled_1992

Contemporary artist Robert Gober is best known for illusionistic sculptures that appear, at first glance, to be loaded with psychological content and explicit symbolism (e.g., warped cradles, truncated limbs, functionless sinks). The artist, however, warns the viewer “to focus less, or at least not first, on finding ‘meaning’ or a ‘theme’ in the work, but to focus on what it is exactly, what is it physically made of and how it is made. A lot of times metaphors are almost embedded in the medium.” Following Gober’s advice, this course explores the artist’s evocative work, paying close attention to his working process. The course is held in conjunction with the artist’s first retrospective in an American museum, Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor. Portions of the class will take place both in the exhibition and in MoMA’s collection galleries, as we place Gober’s work in dialogue with Surrealist objects, Pop images and Minimalist abstractions, charting his trajectory toward a way of making that critic and historian Hal Foster has discussed in terms of “traumatic realism.” This three-week course is organized around the following themes: Domestic Fictions (object production), The Body in Pieces (figural sculpture), and The Carceral (installation design).

Kathryn Chiong (PhD, Columbia University) is an art historian with an interest in postwar art. She has published texts on the work of On Kawara, Bruce Nauman, and Lawrence Weiner. Kathryn currently teaches for Adult and Academic Programs and School Programs at MoMA. She has also taught courses at Columbia University.

Register Online
Day

Wednesdays

Sessions

3

Time

8:00–9:50 p.m.

Schedule
11/12, 11/19, 12/3 (No Class 11/26)
Non Member

$260

Member and Corporate Member employees

$230

Student/Educator:

$205

Sound Amplification Available
Studio Immersions

Make art in collaboration with contemporary artists.


Lautrec_la_troupe-s

Making the Message: Printmaking from Toulouse-Lautrec to Today

Starts October 7
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Kerry Downey

View detail
Close
Lautrec_la_troupe

Printmaking has changed the path of modern and contemporary art, carrying social and political messages around the globe. This studio class explores a range of techniques and styles that artists have employed to share ideas, images, and messages. Using the exhibition The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters as a starting point, we'll explore the process and impetus for printmaking in artistic practice through the work of artists like Guerrilla Girls, Eve Fowler, and other contemporaries. Class participants will have a chance to re-create some of these artists' works before creating their own original print. No previous experience is required. All materials are included in class price.

Kerry Downey is an interdisciplinary teaching artist with an MFA from Hunter College and a BA from Bard College. She currently teaches in the undergraduate Fine Arts department at Hunter College and in the Department of Education at MoMA. Her own art has been exhibited at the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, Invisible Dog, A.I.R. gallery, the Bronx River Art Center, and REVERSE gallery, where her work was given a Critic’s Pick by ARTforum.

Register Online
Day

Tuesdays

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28
Non Member

$450

(Materials included)

Member and Corporate Member employees

$400

(Materials included)

Student/Educator:

$360

(Materials included)

Sound Amplification Available
Sturtevant_johns-s

The Modern Studio: Theories and Methods of Theft

Starts October 20
6 Mondays
Instructor: Corey D’Augustine

View detail
Close
Sturtevant_johns

Long before appropriation became a touchstone of postmodern art, Elaine Sturtevant broke into art history by making replicas of some of the most canonical paintings of the 1960s in a body of work that questions concepts of authenticity, authorship, celebrity, and style. With a focus on the exhibition Sturtevant: Double Trouble, this course blends aspects of art history and studio art by examining Sturtevant's work through the lens of the copy itself; each week we'll make a replica of one of Sturtevant's replicas. Artists to be copied include Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Keith Haring, and Frank Stella. This course also examines related uses of appropriation in the work of Marcel Duchamp, the writing of Jorge Luis Borges, and the musical traditions of Jamaica and early rap. No previous painting experience is necessary.

Corey D'Augustine is a painting conservator, a professor of art history, and an artist.

Register Online
Day

Mondays

Sessions

6

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
10/20, 10/27, 11/3, 11/17, 11/24, 12/1
Non Member

$500

(Materials included)

Member and Corporate Member employees

$450

(Materials included)

Student/Educator:

$405

(Materials included)

Sound Amplification Available
Duchamp_3_standard-s

Mind Games: Exploring Process in Artistic Practice

Starts October 22
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Stina Puotinen

View detail
Close
Duchamp_3_standard

Where do “good” ideas come from? How have artists in the Museum’s collection dealt with creative block? Collaboration? Why and how do artists share ideas, and how have these interactions affected their own work? Artists from the Dadaists and Surrealists through the conceptual artists of the 1960s and 1970s to today’s contemporary artists have experimented with collaboration, games, and self-imposed or shared criteria to spark inspiration and break through periods of creative block.

Through a series of creative prompts, course participants experience firsthand some of the tricks, games, and rituals mined from collection artists’ actual/historical practice. Students are encouraged to experiment with materials, expand their definition of art and art-making, and ultimately develop their own methods to keep their creative practice active—or jump-start a new one!

Stina Puotinen received her BA in art history and studio art at Vassar College, and has been working as an artist, museum educator, and occasional curator in New York City for the past 10 years. She currently teaches at several leading arts institutions, including MoMA, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum, and has previously worked at the Brooklyn Museum, The Jewish Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and others. Born out of her work in Museums, both literally and ideologically, is her past work as cofounder of the video and performance collective CHERYL, and the curatorial production team Limited Time Only. She lives and works in Brooklyn.

Register Online
Day

Wednesdays

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12
Non Member

$450

(Materials included)

Member and Corporate Member employees

$400

(Materials included)

Student/Educator:

$360

(Materials included)

Sound Amplification Available
Sturtevant_elastic_tango-s

Creative Appropriation with Artist Michael Mandiberg

Saturday, November 22
1 Saturday
Instructor: Michael Mandiberg

View detail
Close
Sturtevant_elastic_tango

Join artist Michael Mandiberg for an exploration of appropriation, collage, and found art from an artist’s perspective. Mandiberg leads an afternoon conversation on the theory and practice of appropriation, charting a path through MoMA’s Sturtevant: Double Trouble exhibition and touching on key works from MoMA’s collection to establish a terrain of creative appropriation. To complete the circle, participants make their own digital readymades and appropriations in response to Mandiberg’s propositions and provocations.

Michael Mandiberg is an interdisciplinary artist, scholar, and educator. His work explores systems of exchange, ranging from financial markets to the sharing-based peer-production of Free Culture, and from copies of copies of images to the disintegration of identities and the displacement of bodies. He lives and works in Brooklyn.

Register Online
Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

1:00–5:00 p.m.

Schedule
11/22
Non Member

$50

Member and Corporate Member employees

$35

Student/Educator:

$30

Sound Amplification Available
After Hours

Lautrec_divan-s

MoMA After Hours: Toulouse-Lautrec’s Nightlife

Thursday, October 16
1 Thursday
Instructor: Marianne Eggler

View detail
Close
Lautrec_divan

There is perhaps no other artist whose very name conjures the quintessential image of fin-de-siècle Paris, with its colorful artistic characters, notoriously decadent nightlife, and fabulous divas, than Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. During his brief but brilliant career, the artist was a consummate chronicler of the Art Nouveau era in Paris, an exciting period when the notion of the city as a place of unparalleled artistic and social freedom was truly born. Designed in conjunction with MoMA’s exhibition The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters, this class offers students a unique opportunity to immerse themselves in the sensuous and seductive world Toulouse-Lautrec captured. Enjoy this Paris-inspired evening with food, wine, lively dialogue, and a special visit to the exhibition.

This class is also offered on Wednesday, October 22.

Marianne Eggler is an art, architecture, and design historian who has served as a MoMA lecturer since 1998. A native New Yorker, she holds a BA in art history from the University of Rochester and did her doctoral studies at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is completing her dissertation on Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich's modern domestic interiors. She has lectured both here and abroad on the subject of modern art and design and has taught extensively, both for MoMA courses and at various other institutions, including Parsons The New School for Design, CUNY, and SUNY Buffalo State. Ms. Eggler is currently an adjunct assistant professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

1

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
10/16
Non Member

$120

(Light refreshments included)

Member and Corporate Member employees

$100

(Light refreshments included)

Student/Educator

$80

(Light refreshments included)

Sound Amplification Available
Lautrec_divan-s

MoMA After Hours: Toulouse-Lautrec’s Nightlife

Wednesday, October 22
1 Wednesday
Instructor: Marianne Eggler

View detail
Close
Lautrec_divan

There is perhaps no other artist whose very name conjures the quintessential image of fin-de-siècle Paris, with its colorful artistic characters, notoriously decadent nightlife, and fabulous divas, than Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. During his brief but brilliant career, the artist was a consummate chronicler of the Art Nouveau era in Paris, an exciting period when the notion of the city as a place of unparalleled artistic and social freedom was truly born. Designed in conjunction with MoMA’s exhibition The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters, this class offers students a unique opportunity to immerse themselves in the sensuous and seductive world Toulouse-Lautrec captured. Enjoy this Paris-inspired evening with food, wine, lively dialogue, and a special visit to the exhibition.

This class is also offered on Thursday, October 16.

Marianne Eggler is an art, architecture, and design historian who has served as a MoMA lecturer since 1998. A native New Yorker, she holds a BA in art history from the University of Rochester and did her doctoral studies at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is completing her dissertation on Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich's modern domestic interiors. She has lectured both here and abroad on the subject of modern art and design and has taught extensively, both for MoMA courses and at various other institutions, including Parsons The New School for Design, CUNY, and SUNY Buffalo State. Ms. Eggler is currently an adjunct assistant professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

1

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
10/22
Non Member

$120

(Light refreshments included)

Member and Corporate Member employees

$100

(Light refreshments included)

Student/Educator

$80

(Light refreshments included)

Sound Amplification Available
Frequently Asked Questions


Payment

We accept all major credit cards. To register and pay visit the online registration system.

Discount

Students, educators (K–12, college, and university), and staff of other museums receive a 10% discount on the member rate. Student or staff identification must be presented upon check-in on the first day of class.

Refunds

In order to receive a full refund, notice of cancellation must be sent in writing via e-mail, letter, or fax at least one week before the first scheduled day of class. Payment will not be refunded after this time. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.


If I drop the class can I get a refund?
You will only receive a refund if you cancel your registration at least one week before the first day of class. You may do this by accessing your online registration and clicking the "Modify" tab. You will be able to unregister yourself from a class and receive a full refund. You may also cancel your registration by phone or e-mail. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.

Can I get a refund after the second or third class?
MoMA is unable to grant refunds after the refund period.

If I miss a class can I receive a refund or a make up classes with the instructor?
No. MoMA provides course schedules in advance to provide perspective students the opportunity to plan ahead and make necessary arrangements to attend classes. Students will receive a syllabus and course reader in advance to help themselves prepare for missing class.

Can I take a MoMA Class for credit?
No. MoMA Classes are not accredited. If you wish to receive credit for a MoMA Class, you must organize this with your institution.

How do I register?
All registration is done online. Registration for Fall 2014 will open on September 2, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. To register for online courses, use the online registration system.

Do I have to register online?
Yes. If you have any difficulties using the online registration system, please call (212) 408-8441.

How do I know if a class is full?
If a class is full the website will indicate that the course is sold out. Please note that updates to class availability are made during business hours and courses may fill up overnight or over the weekend. You will know a course is sold out when you attempt to register and the only option you are given is to add your name to the waiting list.

Can I be put on a waiting list for a class that is filled?
Yes. The online registration form includes a waiting list option for sold-out classes. You must fill out the online registration form to be added to the waiting list. Once you complete the registration, you will receive an e-mail confirming that you have been added to the waiting list.

What if I am a member of the Museum?
As a member at the individual level or higher you will receive the members rate. We honor a first-come, first-served policy for class registration regardless of your member status.

How do I sign up for a membership?
If you are not a member and would like to sign up for membership, simply visit the Membership page. If you have any questions about membership, please call Membership Services at (212) 708-9475.

Are Corporate Member employees eligible to receive the member discount?
Yes. A copy of your valid company ID must be faxed or e-mailed to the Corporate Membership Department in order to receive the discounted price.

Will the class have access to the galleries?
When possible, as determined by your instructor and MoMA, students will have the unique privilege to view MoMA's collection in the galleries after hours, during class time.

Will these specific courses be offered again?
Yes and no. There are some courses that will be offered regularly, for example Modern Art 1880–1945 and Modern and Contemporary Art 1945–Present. Some classes may be offered again depending on the instructor's availability, scheduling, and student interest. MoMA cannot guarantee if or when certain classes will be offered again.

If I miss a class and there is another section of the same class being offered on a different day, can I attend the other section of the same course?
No. Each course instructor utilizes a different syllabus. Although there are two sections of the same class offered, the material covered would not necessarily correspond.

Can I register my friend?
Yes. Once you have entered your personal information and selected a class in the online registration form, click the "Add Person" button. Fill out the registration form for this person and be sure to use a separate e-mail address for him or her. Our registration system will not accept multiple registrants with the same e-mail address. Your registration is complete after you have filled out all the required information for both you and your friend and submitted payment. Please note that you will each receive an e-mail confirming your individual registration. Your confirmation e-mail will NOT include a record of your friend's registration information.

Can I bring a friend or family member to attend one of my class sessions so they can experience the program?
No. Though we welcome interest in MoMA Classes, we cannot accommodate guests.


Policies

MoMA reserves the right to cancel or withdraw classes, to change class curricula and scheduling, and to withdraw and substitute instructors.

If an instructor needs to cancel an individual class, we will notify you via phone or e-mail and that class will be made up at a later date.

Students accept full responsibility for personal injury and/or losses suffered during class hours and while on museum premises.

MoMA will not release course participants’ personal information to any persons or organizations outside of the Museum without prior written consent.

Past Classes

Moma_polke_ch2014_1371-s

Taking the Matter in Hand: Sigmar Polke, 1963–2010

Starts April 22
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Ágnes Berecz

View detail
Close
Moma_polke

Was Sigmar Polke “just a little bit too much for everybody,” as John Baldessari stated a few years ago? How can we approach a body of work that has been routinely described as polyphonic, masterly, willfully pathetic, and alchemistic, and that defied all established boundaries of art in the late 20th century with momentous irreverence? By exploring MoMA's Polke retrospective, this short course provides a comprehensive examination of the artist’s paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, films, performances, and photo works from the early 1960s to 2010.

Ágnes Berecz (PhD, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) teaches modern and contemporary art history at the Pratt Institute and in the School of Graduate Studies of the Fashion Institute of Technology. Her writings have been published in Art in America, Artmargins, and Praesens, and in European and U.S. exhibition catalogues.

Register Online
Day

Tuesdays

Sessions

4

Time

7:30–9:30 p.m.

Schedule
4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/20 (No class 5/13)
Non Member

$350

Member and Corporate Member employees

$300

Sound Amplification Available