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The People’s Art Center

A central part of MoMA's program from 1948 to 1961, The People’s Art Center was conceived as an incubator for critical thinking, art making, and creativity. It's this mission that drives what we do today, and that inspired our new series of programs.

Immerse yourself in ideas and opportunities to see your world in new ways through art. Classes, artist-led immersions, and experiences can help you develop new perspectives and become a part of a community of learners unlike any other. In our studios and galleries, you can co-create artworks with MoMA’s artists; on the streets of Midtown, explore the neighborhood with our experts; and dive deep into new concepts and new conversations with innovators and visionaries.

If you can’t make it to MoMA, we also offer both instructor-led and self-guided MoMA Courses Online. Learn more about MoMA Courses Online.


Modern Art and Ideas

“Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences.”—Brian Eno

Explore various periods of modern and contemporary art through programs led by MoMA curators and other prominent experts, both inside and outside MoMA’s galleries.


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Modern Art and Ideas, 1880–1945

Starts February 2
4 Mondays
Instructor: Jennifer Katanic

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This class provides an introduction to the artists, movements, and ideas that contributed to the development of modernism. Sessions will focus on how the emergence of new ways of seeing and thinking about the world led to a radical reconstruction of that world in artists' studios and exhibitions throughout Europe—and how this shift continues to inform the multidisciplinary, global art of today. This foundational course provides an essential overview of art from 1880 to 1945, including criticism, collecting, and museum history to expand existing accounts of the origins of modernism. Artists discussed will include Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh, Gustav Klimt, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Piet Mondrian, Salvador Dalí, and many more.


You can experience this class in one of two ways:

Option 1: Lecture and in-gallery discussions ($325 non-member/$275 member) Lecture followed by breakout group discussions led by curatorial staff in the Museum galleries. Meets from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.

OR

Option 2: Lecture only ($150 non-member/$100 member) Sign up for just the lecture portion, which meets from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m.

You can select either option during the registration process.

*Students interested in this course may also wish to enroll in Modern Art and Ideas 1945–1989.

Jennifer Katanic (PhD candidate, The Graduate Center, City University of New York) is a specialist in postwar Central European art and culture. She is a lecturer in MoMA's Department of Education and works with International Art Guides as a contemporary art educator at Art Basel Miami Beach. She has taught art history at Rutgers University and City College, New York.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–8:30 p.m.

6:00–7:00 p.m. [Lecture Only]

Schedule
2/2, 2/9, 2/23, 3/2 (No Class 2/16)
Non Member

Lecture + In-Gallery Discussion:

$325

Lecture Only:

$150

Member and Corporate Member employees

Lecture + In-Gallery Discussion:

$275

Lecture Only:

$100

Student/Educator

Lecture + In-Gallery Discussion:

$150

Lecture Only:

$80

Sound Amplification Available
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The Neoliberal City: Architectures of Resistance

Starts February 3
6 Tuesdays
Instructor: Jennifer Gray

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This course explores how contemporary designer-activists are advancing change in communities threatened by socioeconomic inequality. The ghettos, informal cities, favelas, illegal dwellings, and gated communities proliferating in cities worldwide are the spatial manifestations of uneven economic growth. How can architecture respond to rising levels of poverty, unequal access to services, and an impending global housing crisis? This social mandate recalls the utopian ambitions of modernism, but contemporary approaches at confronting these issues are pragmatic and grassroots. Can modest measures impact a crisis of such planetary scale? Special attention will be paid to theories of uneven growth, Marxist geography, housing, urban planning, infrastructure, informal settlements, and technology, and to the MoMA exhibitions Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities and This Is for Everyone: Design Experiments for the Common Good.

Jennifer Gray (PhD, Columbia University) is a historian of modern art and architecture, specializing in the relationships between social politics and the built environment. Her work has been published in Future Anterior, Il Giornale Dell 'Architettura, and SmartPlanet. She is an adjunct assistant professor at Columbia University and a lecturer at MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

6

Time

6:30–8:30 p.m.

Schedule
2/3, 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/3, 3/10
Non Member

$475

Member and Corporate Member employees

$425

Student/Educator

$250

Sound Amplification Available
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MoMA Highlights: Four Game-Changers—Joan Miró, Jean Dubuffet, Jackson Pollock, and Joseph Beuys

Starts February 4
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Elisabeth Bardt-Pellerin

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This course takes a close look at four artists who redefined and expanded the boundaries of what art could be. Each week we focus on one artist, with extensive exploration of how that artist’s experimental and conceptual approaches to art and process pushed the parameters of aesthetics in modern and postmodern movements. Students will spend time in MoMA's collection galleries as part of the class, and each student will receive a copy of the book MoMA Highlights: 350 Works from The Museum of Modern Art, New York as part of the class price.

Elisabeth Bardt-Pellerin (MA in art education, Concordia University, Montreal) is a frequent lecturer at MoMA and the Guggenheim Museum.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Schedule
2/4, 2/18, 2/25, 3/11 (No Class 2/11, 3/4)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$150

Sound Amplification Available
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Photography and Modernity at MoMA (Daytime)

Starts February 18
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: David Smucker

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This course focuses on how the idea of the “modern” applies to works of art, and in particular to photographs. During the first half of the 20th century, artists debated what it meant to be modern, and we will explore how different stances on this contested issue influenced the art they made. This course pays special attention to the exhibition Modern Photographs from the Thomas Walther Collection, 1909–1949, which features images associated with movements including Constructivism, New Objectivity, and the f/64 group. Examples of 20th-century painting and sculpture from MoMA's collection provide us with other contexts for these ideas. At the end of this course, we will investigate how the legacy of modernism continues to resonate in contemporary art.

David Smucker is a PhD candidate in art history and criticism at Stony Brook University. His research focuses on contemporary art and the history of photography, and his in-progress dissertation examines photography’s relationship to car travel and the American road trip.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
2/18, 2/25, 3/11, 3/18 (No Class 3/4)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$150

Sound Amplification Available
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Photography and Modernity at MoMA

Starts February 18
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: David Smucker

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1_photographyandmodernityatmoma_agirlwithaleica

This course focuses on how the idea of the “modern” applies to works of art, and in particular to photographs. During the first half of the 20th century, artists debated what it meant to be modern, and we will explore how different stances on this contested issue influenced the art they made. This course pays special attention to the exhibition Modern Photographs from the Thomas Walther Collection, 1909–1949, which features images associated with movements including Constructivism, New Objectivity, and the f/64 group. Examples of 20th-century painting and sculpture from MoMA's collection provide us with other contexts for these ideas. At the end of this course, we will investigate how the legacy of modernism continues to resonate in contemporary art.

David Smucker is a PhD candidate in art history and criticism at Stony Brook University. His research focuses on contemporary art and the history of photography, and his in-progress dissertation examines photography’s relationship to car travel and the American road trip.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

7:15–9:15 p.m.

Schedule
2/18, 2/25, 3/11, 3/18 (No Class 3/4)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$150

Sound Amplification Available
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Scoring Modern Life

Starts February 19
4 Thursdays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

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Inspired by the exhibition Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye, this class focuses on the increasingly close relationship between music, art, and design across the last 100 years. A major thread of this course is the way in which design innovations have impacted and shaped our lives—in the street, in the cinema, and in our homes—by altering our sense of how music can be performed, distributed, and visualized. The synesthetic experience, improvisatory sound experimentation, record covers, the “cool” aesthetic of jazz and hi-fi culture, and the creative "hows and whys" of film scoring will be among the fascinating topics we delve into. Our polyphonic conversation will be enlivened by special guest experts: MoMA Film curator Anne Morra and musician/composer Stephane Wrembel. If you are interested in design, film, music, or art, you won’t want to miss this feast for the eyes, ears, and mind.

Larissa Bailiff has worked as an educator and instructor at MoMA for over 12 years. She has taught 25 in-gallery classes since 2005, when MoMA began offering this experience to students. She also teaches MoMA's online survey covering art from 1880 through 1945. Her most recent project is developing content and curriculum for Woofbert, an immersive arts-education technology company.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

4

Time

8:00–10:00 p.m.

Schedule
2/19, 2/26, 3/5, 3/12
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$150

Sound Amplification Available
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Scoring Modern Life (Daytime)

Starts March 5
4 Thursdays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

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Inspired by the exhibition Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye, this class focuses on the increasingly close relationship between music, art, and design across the last 100 years. A major thread of this course is the way in which design innovations have impacted and shaped our lives—in the street, in the cinema, and in our homes—by altering our sense of how music can be performed, distributed, and visualized. The synesthetic experience, improvisatory sound experimentation, record covers, the “cool” aesthetic of jazz and hi-fi culture, and the creative "hows and whys" of film scoring will be among the fascinating topics we delve into. Our polyphonic conversation will be enlivened by special guest experts: MoMA Film curator Anne Morra and musician/composer Stephane Wrembel. If you are interested in design, film, music, or art, you won’t want to miss this feast for the eyes, ears, and mind.

Larissa Bailiff has worked as an educator and instructor at MoMA for over 12 years. She has taught 25 in-gallery classes since 2005, when MoMA began offering this experience to students. She also teaches MoMA's online survey covering art from 1880 through 1945. Her most recent project is developing content and curriculum for Woofbert, an immersive arts-education technology company.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
3/5, 3/12, 3/26, 4/2 (No Class 3/19)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$150

Sound Amplification Available
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New Perspectives on the Postwar Period: 1940s–1960s (Daytime)

Starts March 10
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Deborah A. Goldberg

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This course introduces new perspectives on MoMA's collection of postwar art as reflected in the Museum's current installation on the fourth floor. Classes focus on the time period from the transfer of the School of Paris to New York in the 1940s to Pop art in the 1960s, and we'll examine how the galleries have been reconfigured to emphasize friendships among artists and formal similarities and shared concerns within art movements. The course addresses the following topics: the impact of the School of Paris in New York during World War II; the expansion of the canon to include more women and greater diversity as represented within Abstract Expressionism and Pop art; the recent conservation of paintings by Jackson Pollock; and new acquisitions, including Robert Rauschenberg’s Canyon.

Deborah A. Goldberg (PhD, the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University) teaches art history at the School of Visual Arts, lectures regularly at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and MoMA, and lectures on sculpture for the Christie’s Master’s Program. She designed an online art history course (Modern Art: 1880–1945) for MoMA, wrote the audio tour for the MoMA exhibition Gauguin: Metamorphoses (2014), wrote modern and contemporary audio stops for the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and wrote the adult audio tour for the 2012–13 MoMA collection exhibition Fast Forward: Modern Moments 1913–2013, at the High Museum in Atlanta. She recently wrote the catalogue for an upcoming exhibition, Isamu Noguchi, Patent Holder: Designing the World of Tomorrow, at the M. T. Geoffrey Yeh Art Gallery at St. John’s University, and coedited and contributed a chapter to the book Alexander Archipenko Revisited: An International Perspective (Archipenko Foundation, 2008).

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
3/10, 3/17, 3/24, 3/31
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$150

Sound Amplification Available
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Marking Time: Contemporary Art in the Age of Amnesia

Starts March 11
3 Wednesdays
Instructor: Kathryn Chiong

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This course explores the divergent ways in which time is "marked" in contemporary art. Beginning with the current exhibition The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World, we will explore the notion of "atemporality" that characterizes these works, thinking carefully about what this notion of ahistorical "timelessness" means. We will then consider works from MoMA's collection, focusing on a pair of themes: Past and Future, and Memory and Trauma. The title of this course is taken from the book Twilight Memories: Marking Time in a Culture of Amnesia (1994), by Andreas Huyssen, in which the author refers to "the undisputed waning of history and historical consciousness." This perceived "cultural amnesia" forms part of the critical context for The Forever Now and its implication of an erasure of history.

Kathryn Chiong (PhD, Columbia University) is an art historian with an interest in postwar art. She has published texts on the work of On Kawara, Bruce Nauman, and Lawrence Weiner. She currently teaches for Adult and Academic Programs and School Programs at MoMA, and has also taught courses at Columbia University.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

3

Time

7:30–9:30 p.m.

Schedule
3/11, 3/18, 3/25
Non Member

$265

Member and Corporate Member employees

$230

Student/Educator

$100

Sound Amplification Available
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Here and There: Art in a Global Age

Starts: March 19
4 Thursdays
Instructor: Ágnes Berecz

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How can we map the production and reception of art in the wake of globalization? This course aims to account for the wide-ranging structural transformations that have occurred since the late 1980s by exploring how art is made, exhibited, and consumed in a world of both “intense proximity” and cultural and socioeconomic disparity. Here and There examines the artistic strategies, exhibition policies, and cultural geographies of the global art world and discusses the work of such artists as Luis Camnitzer, Rineke Dijkstra, Mona Hatoum, Thomas Hirschhorn, IRWIN, Alfredo Jaar, Rashid Johnson, Oscar Murillo, and Laura Owens.

Ágnes Berecz (PhD, Université Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne) is an art historian and an associate professor at Christie’s Education New York. She also teaches at Pratt Institute and lectures at The Museum of Modern Art. Her writings have appeared in Art Journal, Art in America, Artmargins, and the Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin, and in European and U.S. exhibition catalogues. Her most recent work includes the two-volume monographic study Simon Hantaï; the essay “Time to Knot,” published in the catalogue of Hantaï’s retrospective exhibition at the Musée national d’art moderne in Paris; and the text “The Event of Painting,” written for the catalogue of Judit Reigl’s retrospective exhibition at the Ludwig Museum in Budapest.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

4

Time

7:30–9:30 p.m.

Schedule
3/19, 3/26, 4/2, 4/9
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$150

Sound Amplification Available
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Modernism and the Everyday (Daytime)

Starts March 30
4 Mondays
Instructor: Heather Cotter

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Modernist sensibilities inform every aspect of our daily lives. Encompassing the way we encounter our world visually, aurally, and viscerally, and extending to our consideration of time and space, modernism shapes both who we are and how we understand ourselves. In this course we explore how modernism has been a defining force in new approaches to painting, photography, film, design, and urban planning, with an emphasis on current exhibitions such as Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye; Modern Photographs from the Thomas Walther Collection, 1909–1949; and Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities.

Heather Cotter (MA, Boston University, and MEd with a specialization in art education, Harvard University) is a lecturer at MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

10:30 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

Schedule
3/30, 4/6, 4/13, 4/20
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$150

Sound Amplification Available
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Modern Art and Ideas, 1945–1989

Starts April 6
4 Mondays
Instructor: Jennifer Katanic

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This class provides a broad overview of the events, artists, and concepts that redefined modernism after World War II. Our sessions will focus on the emergence of a vital art center in New York and the birth of Abstract Expressionism, a reengagement with Europe, and a radical rethinking of the process of making art, engaging audiences, and using art for social change. This investigation into postwar art will look closely at key artists—including Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Helen Frankenthaler, Robert Rauschenberg, and Andy Warhol—with attention given to some important but lesser known individuals. The goal is to familiarize students with a range of ideas and themes that form the basis of contemporary art.


You can experience this class in one of two ways:

Option 1: Lecture and in-gallery discussions ($325 non-member/$275 member) Lecture followed by breakout group discussions led by curatorial staff in the Museum galleries. Meets from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.

OR

Option 2: Lecture only ($150 non-member/$100 member) Sign up for just the lecture portion, which meets from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m.

You can select either option during the registration process.

*Students interested in this course may also wish to enroll in Modern Art and Ideas 1880-1945.

Jennifer Katanic (PhD candidate, The Graduate Center, City University of New York) is a specialist in postwar Central European art and culture. She is a lecturer in MoMA's Department of Education and works with International Art Guides as a contemporary art educator at Art Basel Miami Beach. She has taught art history at Rutgers University and City College, New York.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–8:30 p.m.

6:00–7:00 p.m. [Lecture Only]

Schedule
4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 5/4 (No Class 4/27)
Non Member

Lecture + In-Gallery Discussion:

$325

Lecture Only:

$150

Member and Corporate Member employees

Lecture + In-Gallery Discussion:

$275

Lecture Only:

$100

Student/Educator

Lecture + In-Gallery Discussion:

$150

Lecture Only:

$80

Sound Amplification Available
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Latin America in Construction: Art, Architecture, and the Metropolis

Starts April 14
5 Tuesdays
Instructor: Jennifer Gray

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This course explores modern architecture in Latin America during the Cold War, when the region’s spectacular urbanization resulted in an unprecedented alignment between modern design, the politics of development, and the construction of regional identities. Cities such as Mexico City, São Paulo, and Caracas were among the fastest growing cities in the world. The region was a laboratory for experiments in modern housing, planning, and infrastructure, as well as for avant-garde artistic practices, all of which played out against the backdrop of swelling urban populations and volatile political changes. Latin America was contested terrain, geographically and discursively, as evidenced by those who sought to shape the idea of “Latin America” for their own ends. The course format will combine in-depth investigation of the special exhibition Latin America in Construction: Architecture, 1955–1980 with guest speakers who will explore issues related to the construction and preservation of cultural identities, the politics of state-led desarrollismo, modern art under dictatorship, and contemporary challenges related to the proliferation of informal cities, favelas, and ad hoc housing.

Jennifer Gray (PhD, Columbia University) is a historian of modern art and architecture, specializing in the relationships between social politics and the built environment. Her work has been published in Future Anterior, Il Giornale Dell'Architettura, and SmartPlanet. She is an adjunct assistant professor at Columbia University and a lecturer at MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

5

Time

6:30–8:30 p.m.

Schedule
4/14, 4/21, 5/5, 5/12, 5/19 (No Class 4/28)
Non Member

$400

Member and Corporate Member employees

$360

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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Modernism and the Everyday

Starts April 22
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Heather Cotter

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1_modernismandtheeveryday_theatrophone

Modernist sensibilities inform every aspect of our daily lives. Encompassing the way we encounter our world visually, aurally, and viscerally, and extending to our consideration of time and space, modernism shapes both who we are and how we understand ourselves. In this course we explore how modernism has been a defining force in new approaches to painting, photography, film, design, and urban planning, with an emphasis on current exhibitions such as Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye; Modern Photographs from the Thomas Walther Collection, 1909–1949; and Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities.

Heather Cotter (MA, Boston University, and MEd with a specialization in art education, Harvard University) is a lecturer at MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator:

$150

Sound Amplification Available
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De/Constructing Modernism: New Perspectives on Art Today (Daytime)

Starts April 28
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Jennifer Katanic

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This class investigates four decisive moments in modernism that impact art today. Selected case studies include Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque’s development of Cubism (1908–1914), Filippo Tommaso Marinetti’s founding and manifesto of Futurism (1909), Mikhail Larionov and Natalia Goncharova’s participation in the 1912 Donkey’s Tail exhibition in Moscow, and Andre Breton’s Surrealist Manifesto of 1924. Each session provides a focused study of an historical avant-garde event, followed by a session in the galleries that explores the implications of that revolutionary thought or idea. Issues to be discussed include studio practice, identity, politics, material process, and the body. Our visits will include an introduction to the musician Björk and a look at the photography exhibition From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires: Grete Stern and Horacio Coppola.

Jennifer Katanic (PhD candidate, The Graduate Center, City University of New York) is a specialist in postwar Central European art and culture. She is a lecturer in MoMA's Department of Education and works with International Art Guides as a contemporary art educator at Art Basel Miami Beach. She has taught art history at Rutgers University and City College, New York.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
4/28, 5/5, 5/12, 5/26 (No Class 5/19)
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator:

$150

Sound Amplification Available
Studio Immersions

Make art in collaboration with contemporary artists.


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The Modern Studio: Cubism

Starts Tuesday April 14
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Corey D’Augustine

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This course explores the invention and development of Cubism using an interdisciplinary approach that blends elements of studio art, visual analysis, art history, and art conservation. Students gain an appreciation for Cubism from the perspective of the artist, first by examining the historical roots of the movement in slide lectures and in the MoMA galleries, and then by learning to draw and paint a variety of Cubist compositions in the studio. Emphasis will be placed on Cubism’s radical break with the pictorial space of traditional painting, and on its vital implications in the advent of collage and abstraction. Artists examined include Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Marcel Duchamp, and artists associated with the Italian and Russian Futurist movements. No previous painting experience is necessary.

Corey D'Augustine is a painting conservator, a professor of art history, and an artist.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
4/14, 4/21, 4/28, 5/5
Non Member

$450

Member and Corporate Member employees

$400

Student/Educator:

$250

Sound Amplification Available
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Mind Games: Exploring Play in Creative Practice

May 2
1 Saturday
Instructor: Stina Puotinen

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Where do “good” ideas come from? How can artistic collaboration help to break through periods of creative block? This session will trace how artists, from the Dadaists and Surrealists of the early 20th century through today, have experimented with playful, collaborative exercises to spark inspiration. Participants have the opportunity to discuss work on view from MoMA's collection through this lens before using a series of creative prompts to explore firsthand some of the same tricks, games, and rituals that artists have used over time. Throughout the day, participants will learn methods for overcoming creative block and will have the opportunity to deepen their own practices by expanding their ideas of what art can be. Join this session to get inspired by new experiences, new materials, and new people!

Stina Puotinen received her BA in art history and studio art at Vassar College and has been working as an artist, museum educator, and occasional curator in New York City for the past 10 years. She currently teaches at several leading arts institutions, including MoMA, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Art and Design, and the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum. Born out of her work in Museums, both literally and ideologically, was her previous work as co-founder of the video and performance collective CHERYL and founding member of the curatorial production team Limited Time Only. She lives and works in Brooklyn.

Register Online
Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

1:00–4:00 p.m.

Schedule
5/2
Non Member

$50

Member and Corporate Member employees

$35

Student/Educator:

$30

Sound Amplification Available
After Hours

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MoMA After Hours: Making Music Modern

March 19
1 Thursday
Instructor: Marianne Eggler

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What do Blondie, the Rolling Stones, and Jonathan Richman's Modern Lovers all have in common? The dynamic intersection of music and the visual arts. In the early 20th century, the fruitful interplay between music and visual art contributed to the move toward abstraction in fine art painting and commercial art. This dialogue across disciplines reemerged in the album covers of the new wave. Join us for an evening of modern design, music, and mayhem as we raise a glass to our favorite bands and album covers and explore the current exhibition Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye. This MoMA After Hours event includes a visit to the exhibition along with cocktails, an array of appetizers, and an opportunity to create and discuss.

This class is also offered on Thursday, March 22

Marianne Eggler is an art, architecture, and design historian who has served as a MoMA lecturer since 1998. A native New Yorker, she holds a BA in art history from the University of Rochester and did her doctoral studies at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is completing her dissertation on Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich's modern domestic interiors. She has lectured both here and abroad on the subject of modern art and design and has taught extensively, both for MoMA courses and at various other institutions, including Parsons The New School for Design, CUNY, and SUNY Buffalo State. She is currently an adjunct assistant professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

1

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
3/19
Non Member

$100

Member and Corporate Member employees

$80

Student/Educator

$60

Sound Amplification Available
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MoMA After Hours: Making Music Modern

April 22
1 Wednesday
Instructor: Marianne Eggler

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What do Blondie, the Rolling Stones, and Jonathan Richman's Modern Lovers all have in common? The dynamic intersection of music and the visual arts. In the early 20th century, the fruitful interplay between music and visual art contributed to the move toward abstraction in fine art painting and commercial art. This dialogue across disciplines reemerged in the album covers of the new wave. Join us for an evening of modern design, music, and mayhem as we raise a glass to our favorite bands and album covers and explore the current exhibition Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye. This MoMA After Hours event includes a visit to the exhibition along with cocktails, an array of appetizers, and an opportunity to create and discuss.

This class is also offered on Thursday, March 19

Marianne Eggler is an art, architecture, and design historian who has served as a MoMA lecturer since 1998. A native New Yorker, she holds a BA in art history from the University of Rochester and did her doctoral studies at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is completing her dissertation on Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich's modern domestic interiors. She has lectured both here and abroad on the subject of modern art and design and has taught extensively, both for MoMA courses and at various other institutions, including Parsons The New School for Design, CUNY, and SUNY Buffalo State. She is currently an adjunct assistant professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

1

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
4/22
Non Member

$100

Member and Corporate Member employees

$80

Student/Educator

$60

Sound Amplification Available
Artist-Led

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The Making of Mail Art, with Artist David Horvitz and Researcher Zanna Gilbert

February 21
1 Saturday
Instructors: Zanna Gilbert and David Horvitz

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Mail art, which emerged in the late 1960s as a collective, networked medium and an undisciplined offspring of Fluxus, Conceptual art, and experimental poetry, allowed artists to circulate and exchange works and ideas in a sphere uncontrolled by institutions, markets, or state censorship. This one-day session offers the chance to explore the history and making of mail art. The workshop introduces the origins, main figures, principles, and concepts of the mail art movement since its inception, followed by a chance to see some of these works firsthand through a visit to MoMA's Library Special Collections. Contemporary approaches to mail art and its relevance for the present will be considered as Horvitz discusses his mail art projects and the class devises their own mailings for dispatch. Stamps and materials will be included. However, participants are encouraged to bring their own personal materials and will get further instructions regarding this upon registration. Participants who register by February 7 will receive an object made by the instructors through the mail prior to the workshop.

Zanna Gilbert is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Drawings and Prints at MoMA. She organizes research activities dedicated to deepening the knowledge of history and artistic production in Latin America, and is coeditor of post.at.MoMA.org. Gilbert completed her AHRC Collaborative PhD Studentship with Tate Research and the School of Philosophy and Art History at the University of Essex in 2012. Her research focuses on artists’ networks and the transnational circulation of art through the mail.

David Horvitz is a half-Japanese Californian artist who lives in Brooklyn. In his work he grapples with time and standardized measurements and the shifts that occur when natural phenomena are subjected to man-made systems and vice versa. His participatory art, often involving close collaborations with other artists and Web-based audiences, considers strategies of information circulation and the impermanence of digital artifacts. He gathers and disperses images and objects through the Internet, the postal system, libraries, airport lost-and-found services, and more.

Register Online
Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

11:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

Schedule
2/21
Non Member

$60

Member and Corporate Member employees

$45

Student/Educator

$35

Sound Amplification Available
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Painting with Sound: An Introduction to Audio Reactive Programming

SOLD OUT

Starts March 28
1 Saturday, 1 Sunday
Instructor: Joshua Davis

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Join artist Joshua Davis for a two-day workshop in creating visualizations of sound. Students will use JAVA+HYPE software to paint objects onscreen and then expose them to a range of audio input. By assigning a range of form and color to the deepest bass and the highest tweets, the students will create art that responds to the invisible audio world that surrounds us. This program is open to all levels and no prior skills are required.

Joshua Davis is an American designer, technologist, author, and artist. Over his 19-year career as an image maker using programming, Davis has written his own code to produce interactions with users and generate visual compositions according to rule-based, randomized processes. Davis had a role in designing the visualization of IBM’s Watson, the intelligent computer program capable of answering questions, for the quiz show Jeopardy. His work ​is in the collection of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum​, and was exhibited in Design Life Now, the​ National Design Triennial 2006.

Day

Saturday, Sunday

Sessions

2

Time

1:00–5:00 p.m.

Schedule
3/28, 3/29
Non Member

$75

Member and Corporate Member employees

$50

Student/Educator

$40

Sound Amplification Available
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Pocket Storytelling: Building a Photo Story out of a Smartphone

April 11
1 Saturday
Instructor: Jorge Colombo

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If we think of images as words, then selecting and sequencing the right ones can amplify their power. Properly strung together, they can become a story, a poem, or a question. The smartphones most of us carry in our pockets allow us to assemble and disseminate visual messages in a quick and effective way. But our main tools are not in our cameras or apps; they're in our minds. This class explores the legwork, contemplation, and experimentation necessary to locate unpredictable bits of our environment as the basis for storytelling. Join artist Jorge Colombo for a creative day of shooting your own images inside and outside MoMA; discussing how other photographers create narratives in their work; and selecting, creating, and sharing your own photo story. Each participant has the opportunity to post his or her final narrative online. The program is open to all levels, and no prior skills are required. Participants are asked to bring a smartphone.

Jorge Colombo has worked as an editorial illustrator, as a photographer, and as a graphic designer. He was born in Lisbon, Portugal, and has lived in the U.S. since 1989. For the past six years virtually all of his output—paintings and photographs—has been created with either an iPhone or an iPad.

Register Online
Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

10:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Schedule
4/11
Non Member

$60

Member and Corporate Member employees

$45

Student/Educator

$35

Sound Amplification Available
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Uncovering Deep Time in Midtown: A Walking Tour

April 25
1 Saturday
Instructors: smudge studio

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Spend an afternoon on a New York City walking tour with the artist collaborative smudge studio (Elizabeth Ellsworth and Jamie Kruse). While much of this city’s architecture and infrastructure depends upon geologic materials that took millennia to form, most humans have little cultural awareness of this reality today. During this walk, participants are invited to experience and consider for themselves the geologic forces and flows that give form and foundation to New York City. After considering the geologic materials embedded within everyday life here, we will consider deep futures in the making and how city dwellers might inhabit and creatively navigate current planetary changes. The walk pauses at three sites where participants will be invited to conduct on-site research through sketching and by accessing relevant information on their mobile phones. At each stop, smudge studio will offer a provocation to use art and design as "aesthetic prostheses" for considering New York City as an aperture onto deep time. The walk covers a distance of approximately two miles and includes visits to Central Park and Rockefeller Center. Each participant will receive a complimentary copy of smudge studio's Geologic City: A Field Guide to the GeoArchitecture of New York (2012).

Elizabeth Ellsworth is an artist and a professor of media studies at The New School. She teaches courses in media and change, and she has published several books on mediated learning environments. She is also a member of the Atomic Photographers Guild.

Jamie Kruse is an artist, designer, and part-time faculty member in the School for Design Strategies at Parsons The New School for Design. Her work has been supported by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts; the New York State Council for the Arts (2010, 2011) and the Brooklyn Arts Council, among others. In the spring of 2014 she was a guest researcher for Future North (AHO Oslo). She is the author of the Friends of the Pleistocene blog.

Ellsworth and Kruse are codirectors of smudge studio, an art collaborative founded in 2005. Their process involves performative field research, practice as aesthetic response, and public pedagogy. smudge studio’s current work attempts to translate abstract and complex ideas regarding planetary change into aesthetic provocations and "embodied practices." These activities invite audiences into intentional and meaningful coexistence with contemporary forces and the scales of change (both natural and human-made).

Register Online
Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

2:00–4:30 p.m.

Schedule
4/25 (Rain Date: 4/26)
Non Member

$60

Member and Corporate Member employees

$45

Student/Educator

$35

Sound Amplification Available
Frequently Asked Questions


Payment

We accept all major credit cards. To register and pay visit the online registration system.

Discount

Students, educators (K–12, college, and university), and staff of other museums receive a discount on the member rate. Student or staff identification must be presented upon check-in on the first day of class.

Refunds

In order to receive a full refund, notice of cancellation must be sent in writing via e-mail, letter, or fax at least one week before the first scheduled day of class. Payment will not be refunded after this time. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.


If I drop the class can I get a refund?
You will only receive a refund if you cancel your registration at least one week before the first day of class. You may do this by accessing your online registration and clicking the "Modify" tab. You will be able to unregister yourself from a class and receive a full refund. You may also cancel your registration by phone or e-mail. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.

Can I get a refund after the second or third class?
MoMA is unable to grant refunds after the refund period.

If I miss a class can I receive a refund or a make up classes with the instructor?
No. MoMA provides course schedules in advance to provide perspective students the opportunity to plan ahead and make necessary arrangements to attend classes. Students will receive a syllabus and course reader in advance to help themselves prepare for missing class.

Can I take a MoMA Class for credit?
No. MoMA Classes are not accredited. If you wish to receive credit for a MoMA Class, you must organize this with your institution.

How do I register?
To register for online courses, use the online registration system.

Do I have to register online?
Yes. If you have any difficulties using the online registration system, please call (212) 408-8441.

How do I know if a class is full?
If a class is full the website will indicate that the course is sold out. Please note that updates to class availability are made during business hours and courses may fill up overnight or over the weekend. You will know a course is sold out when you attempt to register and the only option you are given is to add your name to the waiting list.

Can I be put on a waiting list for a class that is filled?
Yes. The online registration form includes a waiting list option for sold-out classes. You must fill out the online registration form to be added to the waiting list. Once you complete the registration, you will receive an e-mail confirming that you have been added to the waiting list.

What if I am a member of the Museum?
As a member at the individual level or higher you will receive the members rate. We honor a first-come, first-served policy for class registration regardless of your member status.

How do I sign up for a membership?
If you are not a member and would like to sign up for membership, simply visit the Membership page. If you have any questions about membership, please call Membership Services at (212) 708-9475.

Are Corporate Member employees eligible to receive the member discount?
Yes. A copy of your valid company ID must be faxed or e-mailed to the Corporate Membership Department in order to receive the discounted price.

Will the class have access to the galleries?
When possible, as determined by your instructor and MoMA, students will have the unique privilege to view MoMA's collection in the galleries after hours, during class time.

Will these specific courses be offered again?
Yes and no. There are some courses that will be offered regularly, for example Modern Art 1880–1945 and Modern and Contemporary Art 1945–Present. Some classes may be offered again depending on the instructor's availability, scheduling, and student interest. MoMA cannot guarantee if or when certain classes will be offered again.

If I miss a class and there is another section of the same class being offered on a different day, can I attend the other section of the same course?
No. Each course instructor utilizes a different syllabus. Although there are two sections of the same class offered, the material covered would not necessarily correspond.

Can I register my friend?
Yes. Once you have entered your personal information and selected a class in the online registration form, click the "Add Person" button. Fill out the registration form for this person and be sure to use a separate e-mail address for him or her. Our registration system will not accept multiple registrants with the same e-mail address. Your registration is complete after you have filled out all the required information for both you and your friend and submitted payment. Please note that you will each receive an e-mail confirming your individual registration. Your confirmation e-mail will NOT include a record of your friend's registration information.

Can I bring a friend or family member to attend one of my class sessions so they can experience the program?
No. Though we welcome interest in MoMA Classes, we cannot accommodate guests.


Policies

MoMA reserves the right to cancel or withdraw classes, to change class curricula and scheduling, and to withdraw and substitute instructors.

If an instructor needs to cancel an individual class, we will notify you via phone or e-mail and that class will be made up at a later date.

Students accept full responsibility for personal injury and/or losses suffered during class hours and while on museum premises.

MoMA will not release course participants’ personal information to any persons or organizations outside of the Museum without prior written consent.

Past Classes

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Taking the Matter in Hand: Sigmar Polke, 1963–2010

Starts April 22
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Ágnes Berecz

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Was Sigmar Polke “just a little bit too much for everybody,” as John Baldessari stated a few years ago? How can we approach a body of work that has been routinely described as polyphonic, masterly, willfully pathetic, and alchemistic, and that defied all established boundaries of art in the late 20th century with momentous irreverence? By exploring MoMA's Polke retrospective, this short course provides a comprehensive examination of the artist’s paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, films, performances, and photo works from the early 1960s to 2010.

Ágnes Berecz (PhD, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) teaches modern and contemporary art history at the Pratt Institute and in the School of Graduate Studies of the Fashion Institute of Technology. Her writings have been published in Art in America, Artmargins, and Praesens, and in European and U.S. exhibition catalogues.

Register Online
Day

Tuesdays

Sessions

4

Time

7:30–9:30 p.m.

Schedule
4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/20 (No class 5/13)
Non Member

$350

Member and Corporate Member employees

$300

Sound Amplification Available